Glossop Heritage Trust

The Incorporation of the Borough of Glossop.

This page is a transcript of two articles by Robert Hamnett, published in the Glossop Chronicle in 1913.

How it was brought about.
The unsatisfactory state of the police system, unlighted streets, and inefficiency of the sanitary system, led to an agitation for the enfranchisement of the town, and on the 26th October, 1859, a public meeting was held in favour of the same. It was decided to get up a petition, and on the 26th November it was decided to send the petition, which had been signed by 2,400 householders, to Lord John Russell, the Secretary of the State, but no notice was taken of it.

The state of affairs did not improve; the climax was reached when Lord Howard issued out a notice on the 9th September, 1864, to the effect that he could no longer legally supply the town with water.

No time was lost in discussing the serious state of affairs, and three day afterwards, on the 12th, a meeting was held in the Town Hall, but only 20 attended. It had not been properly called or advertised; so it was decided to have another one on the 22nd. By this time everyone realised the seriousness of the position, and in consequence the Town Hall was packed, and it was resolved that the Local Government Act should be adopted. To do this it was necessary to call a Vestry Meeting, to give it legal effect. This took place on the 31st October, but there were many present who opposed it, and the meeting was adjourned to the 21st November, when it was finally settled to apply for a Charter of Incorporation, and Mr. Thomas Ellison was appointed to carry out the same.

This was done, but nothing was heard of the matter until 16th May, 1865, when Captain Donnelly, a Government Inspector, visited Glossop and held an enquiry. He was not satisfied, and came again and held another enquiry on the 25th July. Again nothing was heard of the result of his investigations and the local press published letters almost weekly from householders of Glossop, blaming the Committee. The following three are samples of what appeared:

To the Editor of the Glossop Record:
Sir, With your permission, I beg to suggest that the authorities of the town (if there are any), post up at the various entrances to the town, in plain legible words on a proper board, the following notice:
When this way you travel.
Pray bring your own gravel.
Yours respectfully, BAD GRAVEL.

To the Editor of the Glossop Record:
Sir, You will admit? I have not the slightest doubt, that it is a vexatious to be beset at every turn I take in this highly favoured town, with a practical demonstration of the heading to this letter. If I stand on Victoria Bridge, and cast my eyes to the south there is nothing but mud meets my gaze, and if I turn to the opposite pole, deep cart ruts filled with water rise up before my vision, and place me in a sea of “muddy perplexities.”
Is there no remedy for this muddy state of things. Is public spirit entirely dead. Is there no energy left? Surely it it has not all been spent in battling for a corporation. It has been sneeringly remarked that Captain Donnelly took away with him in his trunk the last vestige of public energy, and that no further efforts to introduce a “local parliament” will be made. As I was absent from the town during the last official visit of Captain Donnelly, I am unable to say what he took away with him, but if he did not abstract from us what is stated, what a pity it is he did not carry away at the same time, those Glossop nincompoops; who threw cold water on every wise and beneficial scheme attempted to be introduced into the town. Yours truly, A SHOPKEEPER.

To the Editor of the Glossop Record:
Sir, Waiting for the dinner hour at a friend's house in Glossop the other day, I incidentally heard some gentlemen complaining of the “filthy state of the roads in Glossop”, by which I might infer that the said gentlemen were in the habit of walking in that part of the Queen's highway intended for the use of horses, and other quadrupeds I forbear to mention.
I have long thought upon and felt the grievance of which these gentlemen complained. Their complaint is a just one, but applies with more force to the disgraceful condition of our footpaths than to the roads. There is nothing regular about them except their unevenness; they consist in one place of hillocks and puddles; in another of slush, which I must say is anything but creditable to us as a people talking about the enfranchisement of the town.
If the Reform clique, who hold their deliberations at the Norfolk Arms, would direct their energies to the rectification of local abuses, they would be rendering practical service to the town, and deserve well of their fellow townsmen. Before they attempt to redress national grievances, would it not be better of them to agitate for local sanitary reforms and remove the pigsty appearance of the town which the miserably dirty footpaths unmistakably present. I hope this dirty subject will be taken up by some one better qualified than A FACTORY LAD.

However, on the 23rd October, 1866, a strange looking parcel arrived which proved to be the long looked for Charter of Incorporation. As few of my readers have ever had the opportunity of perusing it, I give it:-

Charter of Incorporation of the Borough of Glossop.
The following extracts from the Charter will no doubt be read with interest by the Burgesses of the Borough of Glossop.

After referring to the petition presented to the Privy Council by the inhabitants of the Hamlets of Glossop, Whitfield, Simmondley, Dinting, Hadfield, Padfield, and Chunal, the Charter proceeds - And whereas, afterwards, to wit, on the fourteenth day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty five, our Privy Council did proceed to consider the said petition and having since resumed the consideration thereof, have advised us to grant a Charter of Incorporation for the district hereinafter described, situate within the said Hamlets and comprising parts thereof, that is to say; for the district comprising the said Town of Glossop as hereinbefore recited, to be defined by the said “Glossop Market Act, 1844,” together with so much of the township of Glossop as lies without the said Town of Glossop and contiguous thereto, between a certain point situate near to Lanehead, in the Hamlet of Glossop, and a certain other point situate in the Hamlet of Dinting, near to the viaduct of the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway, and across another portion of the said Glossop and Marple Bridge Turnpike Road to the boundary line between the Hamlets of Charlesworth and Dinting and to be drawn along the same boundary line between the Counties of Derby and Chester, near to Brookfield, and along the same boundary line between the same Counties to a point in the Hamlet of Padfield, situate in the same County boundary line to the east of and at a distance of one hundred yards measured along the said County boundary line to the east of and at a distance of one hundred yards measured along the said County boundary line from the centre of the highway which leads from Tintwistle Bridge to the Glossop and Marple Bridge Turnpike Road, where such highway is crossed by the same County boundary line, and to be drawn from the said point in the said County boundary line situate one hundred yards to the east of the centre of the last mentioned Highway in the course and direction of the said Highway at an uniform distance of one hundred yards from the centre line thereof to a point situate one hundred yards from and to the east of the junction of the said Highway with the Glossop and Marple Bridge Turnpike Road at an uniform distance of one hundred yards from the centre line thereof, and on the east and north thereof and crossing the Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road at or near Chunal Intake to a point one hundred yards in a right line distant from and to the east of the centre of the Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road, and from such last-mentioned point in the course and direction of the Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road towards the south, and at an uniform distance of one hundred yards from the centre line thereof, and on the east thereof to the said first-mentioned point in the said circumference situate one hundred yards to the east of the centre of the Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road at or near to Lane Head.

We therefore as well by virtue of the powers and authorities vested in us as by virtue of the powers and authorities given to us by the said recited Act, do hereby grant and declare that the Inhabitants of the said district, comprising the said Town of Glossop, and so much of the said Township of Glossop as lies without the said Town of Glossop, and as is hereinbefore described, and their successors shall be for ever hereafter one body Politic and Corporate in deed, fact and name, and that the said Body Corporate shall be called the Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses of the Borough of Glossop into one Body Corporate in deed, fact and name, do for us, our heirs and successors erect and constitute by these presents. And we do grant to the said Body Corporate that by the same name they shall have perpetual succession, and be for ever hereafter persons able and capable in law to have and exercise, and that they shall have and exercise all the powers, authorities, immunities and privileges which are now held and enjoyed by the several boroughs named in the said “Act to provide for the regulation of Municipal Corporations in England and Wales,” in like manner and subject to the same provisions as fully and as amply to all intents and purposes whatsoever as if the said Borough of Glossop had been included in the Schedules to that Act annexed. And we do hereby extend to the said Inhabitants of the said Borough comprised within the district hereinbefore described, all the powers and provisions of the said “Act to provide for the regulation of Municipal Corporations in England and Wales,” and of all and every other Acts or Act of Parliament made and passed to alter, amend or extend the same Act, and the powers and provisions thereof, or in anywise relating thereto.

And we do further grant, will and declare that the Council of the said Borough shall consist of a Mayor, six Aldermen, and eighteen Town Councillors, to be respectively elected at such times and places, and in such manner as the Mayor, Aldermen, and Councillors for the Boroughs named in the Schedules to the said “Act to provide for the regulation of Municipal Corporations in England and Wales,” except that the first Mayor, Aldermen and Councillors, and the first Auditors and Assessors for the said Borough, shall be respectively elected at such times and in such manner as hereinafter mentioned. And that the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Councillors so to be elected for the said Borough of Glossop, shall respectively have, exercise and enjoy all the powers, immunities, and privileges, and be subject to the same duties, penalties, liabilities, and disqualifications as the Mayors, Aldermen and Councillors of the several Boroughs enumerated in the said “Act for the regulation of Municipal Corporations in England and Wales,” so far as the same are applicable to the Borough of Glossop.

And we further will, grant and declare that the said Borough shall be divided into three Wards to be respectively called All Saints' Ward, Saint James' Ward, and Hadfield Ward. And we further will, grant and declare that our trusty and well-beloved Thomas Michael Ellison, Gentleman, do on the first day of November in the present year, make out an alphabetical list (to be called The Burgess List) of all persons who shall possess the title or qualification required by the said Act of Burgesses of the said Borough of Glossop as aforesaid, and shall cause a copy of such Burgess List to be fixed on or near to the door of the Town Hall, or in some public and conspicuous place within the said Borough, during eight days before the twelfth day of November in the present year. And that every person so possessed of such title and qualification as aforesaid, whose name shall have been omitted in such Burgess List, and who shall have claim to have his name inserted therein shall, on or before the said twelfth day of November in the present year, give notice thereof to the said Thomas Michael Ellison in writing.

And we do hereby appoint our trusty and well-beloved Francis Sumner, Esquire, and John Wood, Esquire, Justices of the Peace for the said County of Derby, or either of them, to revise the same Burgess List, as well as the list of claimants and objections, on the seventh day of December in the present year, in the manner directed in the said “Act for the regulation of Municipal Corporations in England and Wales.”

And we further will, Grant and declare that the first election of the Mayor, Aldermen and Councillors for the said Borough shall be holden respectively as follows:- The first election of Councillors for the said Borough shall be holden on the 21st December in this present year, and that the Aldermen of the said Borough shall be elected and assigned to their respective Wards on the 26th day of December, in this present year, and that the Mayor of the said Borough shall be elected from and out of the said Aldermen and Councillors on the said 26th day of December in this present year.

And we do hereby appoint our trusty and well-beloved Francis Hawke, Esquire, to act as Returning Officer at such first election of Councillors of the said Borough, and at any subsequent election of a Councillor or Councillors of the said Borough, which shall take place (on account of any vacancy occurring among the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Councillors or otherwise) previous to the first day of March, 1867. And in case the said Francis Hawke should die, or should refuse, or become incapable to act as such Returning Officer, at any time previously to the said first day of March, 1867, we do hereby appoint our trusty and well-beloved William Wardlow Howard, Esquire, to act as such Returning Officer as aforesaid in such and the same manner as the said Francis Hawke is hereinbefore appointed to act, and in his place or stead from the time of his so dying, or first refusing, or becoming incapable to act, until the first said day of March, 1867.

And we do hereby direct, that the first election of Auditors and Assessors for the said Borough, shall be conducted and held in the manner and form and at the time specified in the Act or Acts for the regulation of Municipal Corporations in England and Wales.

That All Saints' Ward shall be and comprise all that part of the said Town of Glossop which lies within the metes and bounds following, that is to say:- Within so much of the said circumference of the said circle which comprehends the said Town of Glossop, as extends from the point in the centre of the Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road where the said road is intersected by the said circumference near to Lane Head, curving onwards to the east and round towards the west to the point in the centre of the said Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road, where the said road is intersected by the said circumference near to and to the south of Chunal or Burymewick Mill, and within a line extending from the last mentioned point along the centre of the said Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road, near to Lane Head aforesaid, in which Ward are comprised all the streets, lanes, passages, and places lying within the aforesaid bounds.

That Saint James' Ward shall be and comprise all that part of the said Town of Glossop which lies within the metes and bounds following, that is to say:- Within so much of the said circumference of a circle which comprehends the Town of Glossop as it extends from the aforesaid point in the centre of the Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road, where the said road is intersected by the said circumference near to Lane Head, curving onwards to the west and round towards the east to the point in the centre of the said Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road where the said road is intersected by the circumference, near to and to the south of Chunal or Burymewick Mill, and within a line extending from the last mentioned point along the centre of the same Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road to the said first-mentioned point in the centre of the same Chapel-en-le-Frith Turnpike Road near to Lane Head aforesaid, in which Ward are comprised all the streets, lanes, passages and places lying within the aforesaid bounds.

That Hadfield Ward shall be and comprise all that and so much of the said Borough of Glossop by these presents incorporated as lies without the said circumference of the said circle which comprehends the said Town of Glossop as defined by the said Glossop Market Act, 1844, in which ward are comprised all the streets, lanes, passages and places lying within the aforesaid bounds.

And that each of the said three Wards, that is to say, All Saints' Ward, Saint James' Ward, and Hadfield Ward, shall respectively return six Councillors.

Glossop 1866 street map


Glossop's First Town Council.
No time was lost in holding meetings to nominate suitable persons for the office of Councillor, and on the 10th of December the All Saints' and Hadfield Wards had meetings of which the following is an account:-
Municipal Affairs, Election of Councillors, Friday, 21st December, 1866.
Polling Places.
     All Saints' Ward; The Independent Schoolroom, Littlemoor.
     Saint James' Ward; The Town Hall, High Street.
     Hadfield Ward; The Primitive Methodist Schoolroom, Waterside.
Number of Burgesses in each Ward:
     All Saints' Ward, 272; Saint James' Ward 345; Hadfield Ward, 217.

Public Meeting of the Burgesses of All Saints' Ward.
On Monday evening last a meeting of the Burgesses of All Saints' Ward was held at the house of Mr. James Collier, the Commercial Inn, Hall Street, for the purpose of nominating Councillors for the said Ward. The room was crowded, and great interest was apparently manifested in the proceedings of their first Ward meeting. On the motion of Mr. W. Goodwin seconded by Mr. J. Mellor, it was agreed that Mr. F. Sumner preside.
The chairman opened the business of the evening by reading over the placard convening the meeting, and proceeded to say that the nomination of Councillors for All Saints' Ward was the sole business and he hoped they would nominate only such gentlemen as they felt convinced would truly represent their interests if returned. He thought it more important in the first instance to have the right men in the right place than afterwards, as when the right men got accustomed to the routine of the duties they would then be prepared to check the extravagance of any "kicker" who might hereinafter be returned. Any gentlemen present who were not Burgesses of that Ward would not he hoped take any active part in the business such as proposing a candidate or holding up their hands for or against one proposed.
The following gentlemen were then proposed, seconded and carried by a show of hands (in the order in which they are given) with the exception of those marked thus *:-
Proposed byNominated bySeconded by
F. BuckleyF. Sumner, cotton spinnerC. Hadfield
Wm. GoodwinJames Shepley, dittoMr. Harrison
Wm. BramhallF. Buckley, dittoC. Higginbottom
James BeeleyDaniel Wood, dittoJoseph Mellor
Charles HadfieldJohn Wood, dittoMr. Fox
W. GoodwinJoseph Mellor, grocerJames Beeley
Geo. HarropJohn Hadfield, grocerJ. Earnshaw
C. DanielsJ. Hadfield, cotton spinnerC. Hadfield
Wm. EversdenS. Robinson, grocerJohn Beeley
T. BennettT. P. Sykes, cotton spinnerJ. Dutton
C. HigginbottomJ. Lawton, grocerT. Wilkinson
H. JamesW. Bramhall, cotton spinnerJ. Atkinson
J. DobsonJos. Robinson, clothierJames Beeley
T. BennettJ. Bennett, blacksmithJ. Atkinson
C. WaterhouseJames Bennett, farmerC. Fielding
Mr. ShawD. Fox, paper makerC. Higginbottom
T. Bennett* Daniel Massey, publicannil
J. BennettCharles Hadfield, publicanT. Bennett
Mr. BoothT. Higginbottom, publicanMr. Dutton
W. HillSamuel Shepley, leather dealerA Shepherd
Mr W. Goodwin afterwards proposed the following resolution, and prefaced it by remarking that though cotton predominated very largely in the list he was about to submit to them, he thought that cotton having the greatest stake would be the most likely to exercise caution and economy in the management of the town's affairs. The resolution he had to read was as follows:- Resolved that this meeting highly recommends to the elective Burgesses of All Saints' Ward, the following gentlemen as fit and proper persons to be elected as Councillors for the said Ward.
     Mr. Francis Sumner, cotton spinner
     Mr. James Shepley, cotton spinner
     Mr. Frederick Buckley, cotton spinner
     Mr. John Wood, cotton spinner
     Mr. Joseph Mellor, grocer
     Mr. Samuel Robinson, grocer
Mr. Charles Hadfield (surveyor) said he had great pleasure in seconding the resolution as he thought the six gentlemen names would be very suitable for the office.
The chairman then put the resolution to the meeting when 13 hands were held up in favour of it and 18 against it, so it was declared lost.
Mr. T. Ellison here came forward and said there appeared to be a great dearth of information on municipal matters - people did not know what to do. He might just say that there would be three polling booths, one in each ward, and it had been thought advisable that as it would be the first municipal election in the town and voters not knowing how to proceed, that they should attend at their respective booth on the day in question, where they would receive voting papers and be instructed how to fill them up. It was customary in other places (at least he knew it to be so in Stalybridge) for candidates to provide their own voting papers; and if Mr. Goodwins resolution had passed he should have recommended that course in the present instance as it would greatly facilitate the business. He would be glad to give them any information upon the subject that he could.
Mr. Joseph Bennett proposed, and Mr. W. Goodwin seconded, a vote of thanks to the chairman, which was duly acknowledged, and the meeting separated.

Public Meeting of the Burgesses of Hadfield Ward.
On Tuesday evening a meeting of the Burgesses of the above Ward was held in the Wesleyan Schoolroom, Hadfield, for the purpose of nominating Councillors for the said Ward, Mr. William Shepley in the chair.
The following is a list of the gentlemen as they were proposed:-
     Mr. James Sidebottom, cotton manufacturer.
     Mr. William Shepley, ditto.
     Mr. Edward Platt, ditto
     Mr. Robert Lees, ditto.
     Mr. George Eastham, grocer.
     Mr. Thomas Rhodes, cotton manufacturer.
     Mr. John Tweed, publican.
     Mr. Samuel Wood, grocer.
The usual vote of thanks to the chairman was then proposed, which he briefly acknowledged, and the meeting separated about a quarter to eight o'clock.
The election took place on the 21st December, 1866. The election addresses of the various candidates made very interesting reading.

The following handbill was widely distributed the day before the election in St. James' Ward;
Borough of Glossop. The Burgesses of Saint James' Ward.
Gentlemen, - Before you vote tomorrow (Friday) you are requested to study the following figures:-
Persons nominatedRated to the Poor
£    s d
     Paying at 2s. in the £
John Handforth186 15 018 13 6
Charles Collier81 16 88 3 8
Joseph Woodcock71 10 07 3 0
Thomas P. Wreaks61 10 06 3 0
Joseph Stafford46 3 44 12 4
Samuel Kershaw, about30 0 03 0 0
William Smith, about30 0 03 0 3
John Ashton26 16 82 13 8
George Woffenden22 8 42 4 9
Levi Jackson18 15 01 16 6
Cyrus Garside15 7 64 11 9
George Benton15 6 81 10 8
John Lawton12 8 41 4 9
William Bowden12 8 41 4 9
Isaac Hadfield9 2 618 3
Samuel Bennett8 0 016 0
John France5 10 011 0
There may be special reasons why some of the electors will vote for certain Candidates; but reflecting men will conclude that those who pay the largest sum to the rates, will look best after the expenditure of them. As the occupiers of Cottages will be liable to pay their own Borough Rates, they will see how important it is that proper men should be returned. We presume that no Burgess will be given more than a conditional promise, which will leave him perfectly free to choose now that all the Candidates are known and their position better understood, Yours truly. A Number of Considerable Ratepayers.

The First Election.
The result of the election was as follows:-

All Saints' Ward (272 Burgesses)
Daniel Haigh Wood, cotton manufacturer, Moorfield House 218
Francis James Sumner, ditto, East View House 215
Frederic Buckley, cotton spinner, Holly Bank Hurst 201
John Hadfield, cotton spinner, Cowbrook 196
James Shepley, cotton spinner, Marple 183
Samuel Robinson, grocer, High Street East 127
Not Elected
James Rhodes, surgeon, Milltown 90
Joseph Mellor, grocer, High Street East 69
William Bramhall, cotton manufacturer, Glossop 55
Thomas Pattinson Sykes, cotton spinner, Glossop 45
Joseph Higginbottom, farmer, Glossop 7

Saint James' Ward (345 Burgesses)
Joseph Middleton Stafford, cotton spinner, Norfolk Street 226
Joseph Woodcock, innkeeper, Norfolk Hotel 218
John France, butcher & auctioneer,High St. West 179
George Woffenden, draper, High Street West 165
Levi Jackson, band manufacturer, Hobroyd 160
John Ashton, draper, Whitfield 148
Not Elected
Charles Collier, grocer, High Street West 147
Thomas Peacock Wreaks, druggist, Norfolk Street 130
George Benton, contractor, Hollincross Lane 60
Cyrus Garside, joiner, Surrey Street 50
Samuel Bennett, gentleman, Simmondley Lane 47
Samuel Kershaw, waste dealer, Charlestown 44
Isaac Hadfield, yeoman, Lower Whitfield 42
John Lawton, gentleman, Norfolk Street 35
William Bowden, builder, Bernard Street 33
William Smith, grocer, High Street West 32
John Handforth, cotton spinner, Shepley Mill 26

Hadfield Ward (215 Burgesses)
Edward Platt, senr., cotton manufacturer, Hadfield Lodge 102
Thomas Platt, cotton manufacturer, Padfield 98
Thomas Rhodes, ditto , Mersey Bank 98
William Shepley, ditto , Brookfield 97
James Sidebottom, gentleman, Waterside 85
Robert John Lees, cotton mill manager 75
Not Elected
Timothy Holroyd, contractor, Brosscroft
George Eastham, grocer & corn dealer, Waterside 63
John Rolley, gentleman, Waterside 38
John Tweed, publican, Hadfield 12
Ralph Longbottom, innkeeper, Hadfield 11
Samuel Wood, grocer, Hadfield 7
J. Garlick, innkeeper, Hadfield 2
W. Bradbury, grocer, Hadfield 1

The day after the election the “Glossop Record” published the following leading article.
Municipal Affairs, Glossop Incorporated - Its Duties and Responsibilities.
Glossop has entered upon a new phase in its existence, but whether for better or worse is a problem for the future. The town with a portion of its suburbs is now constituted a municipal borough, and the ratepayers of the male sex are raised to the rank of burgesses. It may be problematical whether the borough is prepared for its new honours, and the cost attendant upon municipal government, as the change has been brought about rather by an accidental circumstance than by a settled conviction on the part of the people that that form of government was required, and in opposition to the general wish of the inhabitants of one of the three wards. The change, however, has been made. The first batch of councillors has already been elected, and before our next issue, the Mayor and Aldermen will have been appointed, after which vacancies in the Council occasioned by elevations to Aldermanic dignity will have to be filled up.
It is not a little unfortunate, and augurs ill for peace and united action, that one ward is decidedly opposed to connexion with the other two, and deems the being associated with them an act of injustice. The distance of the Hadfield Ward, its isolation and separate interests, will form a very serious difficulty, unless its separate interests are separately provided for, and separate rating is adopted according to expense incurred, or privileges enjoyed. It is to be hoped that the members of the Council will enter upon their duties with a purpose to promote the interests of the borough; that obstruction will have no place in the vocabulary of any of them; that bear and forbear; give and take, in a spirit of concession and kindness, will be the universal motto. Much depends in relation to the peace and prosperity of the borough upon the first Council. The spirit and tone of this body will descend to their successors, and may operate for good will upon the generation yet unborn. A heavy responsibility rests upon our newly made Councilmen. They will not act simply for themselves. They may make or mar the borough; render it an abode of peace, or a home of party strife and disquietude.
Many of the Councillors elected are men of experience and of aptitude for public business, and to some of them the parish of Glossop owes a very large debt of gratitude for services rendered. Very much will depend upon an efficient Mayor and Town Clerk, and we sincerely hope that the choice that may be made of these officers will be wise and prudent; that all party spirit will be eschewed; and that the right men will be put in the right place. We shall watch the proceedings of the Council with interest, and impartially review its proceedings.


The first meeting of the Town Council was held on the 26th December, and elected Francis James Sumner the Mayor, also two Aldermen for each Ward, viz.
All Saints' Ward.
Francis James Sumner; Daniel Haigh Wood.
James Rhodes and Joseph Mellor were elected Councillors, being the next of the unsuccessful candidates.
Saint James' Ward.
J.M. Stafford; Joseph Woodcock.
Charles Collier and Thomas P. Wreaks elected Councillors.
Hadfield Ward.
William Shepley; James Sidebottom.
Timothy Holroyd and George Eastham elected Councillors

The usual advertisements appeared, returning thanks to the electors, those of Messrs. Sumner and Stafford were:-
To the Burgesses of All Saints' Ward.
Gentlemen, I cordially thank you for electing me a Councillor for your Ward, and can assure you that the confidence in me which has been so kindly reposed, and so powerfully expressed, shall not be misplaced.
I rejoice that in the Council over which I have been honoured by being elected to preside as Mayor, there are already to be found tokens of amity and mutual forbearance, which may be taken as auspicious omens of future harmony, and a hearty co-operation for the good of the community.
Gentlemen, I thank you for opening the way for me to the highest municipal honour in this the first year of our corporate existence, and feel how deeply I am indebted to the many friends for the support I have received.
I trust I shall ever evince that strong regard for your interests to which you are so well entitled. - I am, gentlemen, your obedient servant.
Francis Sumner, East View, Dec 27, 1866.

To the Burgesses of Saint James' Ward.
Gentlemen, I have the honour to return you my best thanks for the successful support which you have so kindly given me as one of your representatives in the Town Council of the Glossop Corporation.
I would also like to express my gratification and thanks to the Town Council for their confidence as exercised in raising me to the higher honour of Alderman, which confidence I have no doubt was strengthened by the almost universal support given to me at the poll by the Burgesses of Saint James' Ward. And while offering you my best thanks I would reiterate my promise to do my duty to the best of my ability, and to seek the general well-being and comfort of those whom I have the honour to represent. I remain, Gentlemen, your obedient servant.
Joseph Stafford, Norfolk Street, Dec 27, 1866.

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