Glossop Heritage Trust


The Vestry, Guardians and Workhouse; How Glossop Parish Used To Be Governed


This article is based on the notes of Robert Hamnett, originally published as a series of articles in the Glossop Advertiser in 1913.

It will be interesting to my readers to know how Glossop has been governed in the past. In the Palaeolithic period the occasional inhabitants of the hamlet of Glossop must have had no regular laws; they had no worldly possessions to defend or preserve; they lived from hand to mouth; it was everyone for himself, and might was right.
In the Neolithic period when the people had domestic animals and cultivated land, they must have had some kind of laws to secure to themselves the fruits of their labours. What those laws were is a matter of conjecture.

Early Systems of Government.
In the days of the ancient Britons we have evidence which enables us to understand, in a measure, their ways of living. They were divided into tribes, occupying certain defined areas of the country. They had chiefs of various degrees of rank, and their laws were made by the Druids and administered by them. Every able-bodied man was trained to arms, as the Romans soon found out to their cost.
When the Romans became firmly established they brought into force and use their own system of government. The country was divided into six divisions, a deputy governor being in charge and responsible to the prefect for the good order and the finance of his own district.
Each of these six districts were divided into 33 sub-districts or townships, the inhabitants of whom chose their own governor, who was generally an educated Briton. The principal officers were always Romans of high birth. Each of these townships had a kind of municipal government, magistrates, and minor officials to collect the poll tax, the tithes of the produce of mines, such as the lead mines at Bradwell and Castleton; proportion of corn, hay, and cattle, varying according to the wealth of the producer. These taxes in kind were paid at the praetorium or market place of Melandra Castle where there was a granary to store the corn until the next harvest. The military organisation was such that young Britons were drafted abroad and stationed far from Briton, whilst natives of those parts were brought and stationed here; that is why Valercies Vitalis was in command of a detachment of Frisians or Germans at Melandra Castle. Under the Roman yoke the inhabitants became educated, civilised and wealthy. After the departure of the Romans, A.D. 436-460, came a series of invasions by the Picts, Scots, Saxons, and Danes, and for nearly 400 years the inhabitants had to fight for their existence. During that period inter-marriages took place, and the only true Britons could be found in Wales, the remainder having been wiped out of existence or intermingled with the invaders. In the Saxon times the country was divided into seven kingdoms, call the Heptarchy. Glossop was in the Kingdom of Mercia, the largest of the seven. The first king was Crida in 585, and its last Ethelred 892. It was constantly at war with the neighbouring kingdoms, and was ravaged by Canute the Dane in 1016. Mercia was conquered by Egbert, King of Northumbria, and made tributary to that kingdom.
The Anglo-Saxons introduced their own customs, costumes, laws, and language.
During the Anglo-Saxon period townships were formed, consisting of 10 or more families; their district was defined as a rule by natural borders, such as streams, or peculiar landmarks, and exist mainly to the present day. Each township was responsible for the good behaviour of each of its inhabitants, and as in the event of any crime or damage being committed by one of its members, the loss had to be made good by the whole community. It naturally resulted in each one being practically special constables or detectives. Crimes in those days were mainly punished by a series of fines, even murder being commuted by a fine.

Each Hundred consisted of 100 townships. Each Hundred elected representative to the County Council meetings, called the Shermot and Folkmot. The Shermot elected a representative to the Wittengemot, or great council of the nation; by this means every community had the opportunity, if required, of appealing to the highest power in the kingdom. In those days the possession of wealth was of more importance than that of high birth - blue blood did not count. If a man had talents and used them, he got well up the ladder of position. The Saxons had a kind of feudal system which was greatly enlarged when the Normans conquered the country and established themselves firmly as the ruling power, but they did not meddle or alter the divisions of the country.
The office of church warden or reeve was first established in 425, and, therefore, is a most ancient office. 100 years ago the only persons exempt from serving this office were Peers of the Realm, Members of Parliament, lawyers, clergymen, dissenters (if they had religious scruples by finding a deputy), felons, and militia men.
They were chosen, as now, at Easter, by the joint consent of the minister and parishioners; if not, one by the minister and the other by the parishioners. Refusal to accept office could be punished by ex-communication.

The oath was: "You shall swear truly and faithfully to execute the office of a churchwarden within your parish, and according to the best of your skill and knowledge present such things and persons as to your knowledge are presentable by the laws ecclesiastical of this realm; so help you God and the content of this book."
By this oath they are empowered "to sue for the goods of the Church;" "bring an action of trespass for them"; "purchase goods for the use of the parish." They could levy a church rate by calling a vestry meeting, of which due notice had to be given, if the majority of the meeting empowered them to do so. Ratepayers only had the right or power to vote. The Church Rate was for the expenses of keeping the church in repair. If no one attended the meeting the Churchwardens could levy rate themselves. And it was quite legal to do so.

Select Vestry.
"By custom there may be select vestries of a certain number of persons elected yearly to make rates, and managed the concerns of the parish for that year, and such custom is a good custom."
"The rates for the repair of the church shall be laid upon every occupier of lands in the parish, although such occupier live in another parish."
"A taxation by the pound rate is the most equitable way, and not according to the quantity of the land."
"Of common rights, the soil and freehold of the Church is the person’s; the use of the body of the Church, and the repairs of it, common to the parishioners, and the disposing of the seats therein the right of the ordinary."
"The spiritual court may compel the parishioners to repair the body of the church, and may ex-communicate every one of them till it to be repaired."
“Every Churchwarden is an overseer of the poor, although every overseer of the poor is not a church warden."
"They shall see that the parishioners resort to Church, and continue there orderly during Divine Service, and shall present the defaulters."
"They shall levy the forfeiture of 12d on Sunday on the goods of persons not coming to church."
"They (or the constable) shall levy the penalty of 3s. 4d. for using unlawful pastimes on the Lord's Day (sports)."
"Persons who murder themselves, or die ex-communicated, are denied Christian burial, and therefore the churchwardens are not to suffer them to be buried in the Church or Churchyard, without special licence from the Bishop."
"They shall receive the penalties for servants, labourers, apprentices, or journey-men gaming in public-houses."
“They shall receive the penalties for tippling and drunkenness.”
"They (or the constable) shall levy the penalty for suffering tippling."
"They shall receive the penalties for hawking spirituous liquors."
"They (or the overseers) shall levy the penalty for selling corn by a wrong measure."
"They (or the overseers) shall receive the penalties relating to butter and cheese."
"They (or the overseers) shall levy the penalties relating to weights and measures."
"They shall carry hawkers and pedlars trading without a licence before a Justice of the Peace."
"They (or the overseers) shall pay the High Constable the general county rate, out of their money collected for the poor."
"They shall receive the penalty for servants carelessly firing houses."
"They shall receive the penalties for tracing hares in the snow (and other game penalties)."
“In larger parishes there are officers called sidesmen (anciently synodsmen, otherwise called questmen) to assist the churchwardens in their enquiries and presentment of offenders. They shall be chosen yearly in Easter week by the minister and parishioners, if they can agree; if not, by the Bishop."
The sidesmen's oath is this: "You shall swear that you will be assistant to the churchwardens in the execution of their office, as far as by law you are bound. So help you God."
To enumerate all their duties and responsibilities would occupy the space of several columns of this paper.

Overseers of parishes were first appointed by Act of Parliament in 1601, and overseers of townships in 1633.
Many Acts of Parliament have been passed to regulate dealing with the poor "the poor you have with you always." By act of Parliament passed in 1349 no one was allowed to give to a beggar able to work. In 1388 the poor had to reside in the place where they were born, and depend upon the charity of those who knew them; in 1391 appropriators were obliged to give annually a sum for the support of the poor; in 1495 the poor were allowed to beg in the Hundred in which they resided; in 1530 every able-bodied man caught begging was taken and publicly whipped, in 1535 systematic attempt was made to relieve the poor who were in great distress owing to the dissolution of the Monasteries and Monastic establishments; in 1601 overseers were ordered to erect poor houses and given power to levy Poor Rates on householders; in 1834 the numerous and ancient Poor Law Acts were consolidated and Boards of Guardians instituted.

The first poor law guardians in Glossop were elected annually at the vestry meetings held for that purpose. They had their first meeting on December 6th, 1837.
Mr Stevens, the Poor Law Commissioner, explained the duties of the Guardians. Mr Thomas Ellison, of Glossop Hall, was appointed chairman, and Mr James Bosley, the vice-chairman. The members were: Thomas Ellison, James Bosley, Joshua Shepley, John Kershaw, jnr., John Wood (Howardtown), Isaac Linney, Joseph Bennett (Turn Lee), John Goddard, William Platt, James Sidebottom, Samuel Shepley, Henry Lees, and John Shaw. For Ludworth: Joseph Cooper, and James Bradley.

The first contested election of Guardians took place in April 1851
Successful Candidates Votes
John Kershaw, Hurst, cotton manufacturer 940
Daniel Wood, Howard Town, cotton manufacturer 922
Francis J. Sumner, Primrose, cotton manufacturer 890
William Bramhall, Glossop, cotton manufacturer 857
Joseph Woodcock, Greenvale, innkeeper 828
Samuel Pickford, Chunal, innkeeper 819
Samuel Bennett, Dinting Vale, innkeeper 806
James Booth, Charlesworth, machine maker 780
Abraham Jackson, Simmondley, cotton manufacturer 780
Edward Platt, Hadfield Lodge, cotton manufacturer 771
George Platt, Padfield, farmer 729
John Hampson, senior, Whitfield, farmer 716
John Sykes, Woolley Bridge, innkeeper 626
William Shepley, Brookfield, cotton manufacturer 534
Unsuccessful Candidates Votes
William Goddard, Littlemoor, gentleman 336
John Ford, Charlestown, paper maker 250
Joshua Roberts, Deepclough, farmer 233
John Potts, Milltown, butcher 216
John Hampson, junior, Howard Town, grocer 210
George Cheetham, Glossop, brewer 151
Thomas Ashton Shaw, Lower Whitfield, farmer 144
Joseph Hampson, Woodcock Road, innkeeper 124
John Bond, Hadfield, innkeeper 77
Jonathan Brooks, Milltown, corn dealer 34
John Booth, Howard Town, druggist 28
James Cooper, Glossop, shop keeper 26
Joseph Wilkinson, Bridgefield, cotton manufacturer 22

Nominated, but refused to contest, and received no votes:
John Goodison, Windy Harbour, stonemason.
Thomas Higginbottom, Glossop, innkeeper
James Pickford, Glossop, innkeeper
Joseph Stubbs, Vale House, farmer

John Wright, Marple Bridge, innkeeper, was returned unopposed.

The result of the election was a great surprise to some of the candidates. The chairman, Mr William Shipley, was the lowest of the successful ones. He was, however, appointed by the Guardians to be again chairman, and Mr Daniel Wood vice-chairman.

The Clerk presented an account for conducting the election of Guardians for the Eight Townships of Glossop, amounting to £18 3s. 5½d. being one farthing per head on a population of 17,446. Ordered that the same be allowed, and that the further sum of £1 16s. 6½d. be allowed as compensation.

The following account is from the "Manchester Guardian" of Saturday, April 12th:
"First contested election of Guardians. For the first time since the formation of this Union, a contest has taken place this year in the election of Guardians. The result of the poll, which was announced only on Thursday morning last, is the return of the whole list recommended by a meeting held at the Norfolk Arms, previous to the election, and presided over by Samuel Wood of the firm of John Wood and Bros., cotton manufacturers. This list consisted of nine of the older Guardians, three have been Guardians some years ago, and to entirely new names. The poor rate, notwithstanding a heavily increased county rate, has only been for the last three years one shilling in the pound per annum. The following are the numbers polled by the successful candidates: John Kershaw, 940; Daniel Wood, 932; Francis James Sumner, 899; William Bramhall, 857; James Woodcock, 888; Samuel Pickford, 819; Samuel Bennett, 806; James Booth, 780; Abraham Jackson, 780; Edward Platt, 771; George Platt, 729; John Hampson, senr., 716; John Sykes, 626; William Shepley, 534. The remaining candidates, 13 in number, several of whom were marked in the voting papers as not qualified, ranged from 336 to 22; their non-qualification, no doubt, operating against their numbers of the poll."

The office of Poor Law Guardian is an important and responsible one, more so than many parishioners are aware of. A model Guardian must be one who has sympathy with the deserving poor, and yet be just before being generous. There are hundreds of poor people who play Poor Rate and to do so have to deny themselves of many things which they are justly entitled to enjoy. In many instances their children are ill shod and badly clothed and nourished, because they cannot afford to keep them otherwise. The applicant for relief who can tell the most plausible tale is generally the least deserving, and a knowledge of human nature is an essential qualification for a Poor Law Guardian. Courage and firmness is required to deal with the loafer and dissolute. Our forefathers dealt with them severely. Able-bodied men must work - that was their motto.
The duties of a Poor Law Guardian of varied and numerous, and none but those who have time to attend and administer the pool or have a moral right to seek the office of a Guardian, of sound judgement, common sense and a personal knowledge of the working classes are required in dealing with applicants for outdoor relief, the applications for which should be carefully watched, as fraud and deceit are sometimes attempted and not always unsuccessfully. Great discrimination is also required in dealing with the casuals. A genuine workman out of work and a regular tramp have, in the past, in many Unions, been treated equally; this was most unjust, and has been the means of turning men conscientiously seeking work into habitual tramps.
Since the Unemployment Act came into force many improvements have been made in the treatment of genuine working men on the road, but there is room for improvement yet.
Parental love is a desirable quality to possess. Children ought not to be allowed in workhouses.
“Rattle his bones over the stones;
He's only a pauper whom nobody owns."

This idea, I am afraid, has been too common in the past. Children are an heritage from God. "Blessed is the man who hath his quiver full of them." They should be fed with good wholesome food, warmly clothed, and educated. One never knows how many "Stanley’s” there may be amongst them. The policy should be to get them out in the country, where they can get plenty of fresh pure air, and enjoy the beauties of nature. The mentally defectives deserve pity, when it does not arise through an ill-spent life, and their sad lot should be made as easy as possible.
Business qualifications are required to qualify for a member of the Assessment Committee, who have to deal with appeals for reduced assessments. The majority of people do not go to the Workhouse until they are on the brink of the Abyss of Despair and Want. Why? There is no shame in drawing sick pay from a Friendly Society, because one has paid his monthly contribution. When one has paid Poor Rates all the time he has been a householder, why should it be a disgrace to end his days there, when there is no relative or friend who can afford to give him shelter? A Workhouse ought not to be called by that name, but by the name “Home of Rest”.
How often do we see people enter into the Workhouse almost at death’s door, and yet, with medical attendance, careful nursing, plenty of nourishing food, clean in body and surroundings, and no anxiety as to where the next meal is coming from, warm clothing, and no landlord calling for his rent, no rate or Income Tax collectors to bother them, regular hours, and books and papers to read, can we wonder that many of them living to a ripe old age. When the Old Age Pensions came into operation hundreds cleared out of the Workhouses, but many were soon back again.
Much of the horror of "going in the House" as an inmate arises from the tales our grandfathers and great grandfathers used to tell of the houses of correction, which really were Workhouses in the fullest sense of the word. By 1611 every county had to have one or more houses of correction, with convenient backsides thereunto adjoining, together with mills (tread mills), turns, cards, and such like necessary implements, to set rogues, vagabonds, or other idle vagrants and disorderly persons on work. The country made no allowance for the keep of the inmates; they had to work or starve, and the Master had the power to flog them and put them in irons if he so thought fit. It was the reports of the treatment dealt out to inmates of these Workhouses that gave a feeling of dread in entering one, and the Poor House and Workhouse became as one in the minds of ignorant people. The poor law was no doubt administered in a very harsh manner by Board of Guardian to deter people from entering, and of course people to leave them. Charles Dickens, by his writings, did much to remedy these evils.
Today we are too humane to tolerate any abuses, and the press is too powerful for public bodies to risk any unjust treatment to the inmates of the "Houses of Rest."

Vestry Meetings of the Past and Erection of the “Poorhouse”.
At the Glossop Workhouse are preserved some of the old minute books of the Select Vestry, and Board of Guardians, also overseers' accounts. They are very interesting, and throw a side-light on Glossop life in the past. I therefore give extracts from them

Glossop Overseers' Accounts, April 20th, 1772:
"We whose names are hereunder written at a public meeting held in the Chancel of Glossop do all agree that no money shall be spent upon the Parish accounts at any public meeting whatsoever, but anything that is paid every person shall pay the same of his own pocket, as witness our hands: Christopher Alcock, vicar; Samuel Wagstaff, James Platt, and Robert Hall, of Dinting; John Wagstaffe, Bridge End; John Fielding, Charles Hadfield, and Jordan Bradbury, of Whitfield; William Newton, Samuel Dearnley, John Boyer, and James Platt, of Hadfield; John Hadfield, Charlesworth; Samuel Fielding, Hurst; Robert Sheppard, Milltown; Samuel Bowden, Heath; William Sykes, Torside; Joseph Hague, and Joshua Bramhall, of Chunal; John Burdekin, Woodseats; John Rowbottom and James Winterbottom, of Glossop."

Glossop, May 1st, 1795:
"It was agreed at a Vestry Meeting this day held for that purpose that a standing Overseer of the Poor shall be hired, that the person who engages the office shall collect the money and transact all the business belonging to the office. That the person or persons whose turn it happens to serve the said office shall pay towards hiring the overseer after the rate of 4s. in the pound for so much rent as he or they pay, and the rest shall be paid out of the Poor Rate. And such person as is hired and appointed to the office shall regularly settle his account every month.
That a committee of eight persons shall be chosen every Easter Monday. That is, one out of every town who shall regularly attend the overseer every first day of the month to assist him in the execution of his office. The committee for the year are: John Hadfield for Glossop, Thomas Frost for Padfield, Jesse Warhurst for Hadfield, Joshua Platt for Dinting, William Shepley for Whitfield."

June 1st, 1796:
"These overseers' accounts, seen and allowed by us as being the accounts of Thomas Frost, of Deepclough, hired overseer for the township of Glossop, etc., on the part of Jesse Warhurst and Joseph Garlick, both of Hadfield, according to the agreement entered by the inhabitants of the said township of Glossop as appears in the 1st and 2nd pages of this book.
N.B. - "It is agreed that Thomas Frost be continued Overseer of the Poor from the 1st day of May, 1796, for one whole year, on the part of Samuel Cliff, Thomas Waterhouse and Robert Thornley, of Whitfield, according to the before mentioned agreement."

Memorandum
On the 11th day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety six, an act was passed for the raising of a body of supplementary militia for the National Defence of Great Britain, and in order to prevent the serving of improper people, or people likely to become troublesome to the township of Glossop into the said Body of Militia, it was agreed at a public Vestry meeting held in the Chancel of Glossop Church on the 1st day of January, 1797, to accept and receive from such person or persons liable to a ballot within the said townships of Glossop the sum of 10s. 6d. for which sum subscribed it was agreed at the said Vestry to clear the subscriber from any further trouble by virtue of the said act.

June 24, 1797, the following payments were made to volunteers for the Militia: John Robinson, £6 6s.; John Bagshaw, £6 6s.; Ellis Winterbottom, £6 6s.; John Bredbury, £6 6s.; *George Bradshaw, £8 8s.; *Joseph Pennystone, £5 5s.; John Shepley, £6 6s.; Thomas Hague, £6 6s.; Thomas Hibbert, £6 12s.; Stephen Barber, £6 6s.; John Sheppard, £6 6s.; *Joseph Winterbottom, £6 6s.; James Robinson, £6 6s.; John Cooper, £6 6s.; Henry Doxon, £6 6s.; *Joel Harrop, £3 14s. 6d.; Thomas Bird, £7 7s.; Joseph Wood, £7 7s.; John Woodcock, £1 1s.; Robert Longson, £8 16s. 6d.; John Wilson, £10 10s.; Samuel Arnfield, £10 10s.; John Booth, £10 10s.; *John Froggatt, £12 17s.; William Sidebottom, £14; George Bowden, £12 12s.; Robert Marshall, £14 14s.; Thomas Garlick, £15 15s.; George Rowbottom, £11 11s.; William Furnifield, £12 12s.; George Curry, £9 9s.; John Fielding, £10 10s.; James Smith, £9 11s. 6d.; Thomas Garlick, £12 12s.; *Joseph Hadfield, £9 5s.
* Married men
The expenses respecting the said Militia’s journeys, as per bill, was £56.13s. 9d.

March 1st, 1798: £ s. d.
Expenses taking the Militia to Bakewell 1 8 7
Ribbons for Militia 0 4 6
March 21:
James Robinson’s expenses in bringing Militia Men 1 13 3
Paid at Bakewell for two Militia Men 21 0 0
Three other married men, Wagstaffe, Woodhead, and Holbrook volunteered. All the wives of the Militia were supported by the Parish during their husbands’ absence on duty.

Expenses Respecting the Old Militia: £ s. d.
Nov. 1794 - Paid for Militia Men’s Wives at Derby 45 15 4
Expenses to Derby 2 5 6
May 15, 1795 - Militia men's wives at Tideswell 11 17 4
Sept. 9th, 1795 - Wives of the Militia 12 9 8
Expenses attending the same 6 0
Dec. 26th, - Families of the militia 20 1 8
Dec. 15th, 1796 - Wives of Militia men 24 6 0
Feb. 5th, 1797 - To a substitute for the old Militia 7 7 0
May 31st, 1795 - Expenses concerning raising men for his Majesty's Navy.
Glossop 222 houses assessed at 1s. 4½d. in the £ and disbursements on that account
125 5 3
June 5th, 1795 - Expenses going to Bakewell with the money for the Navy 0 10 8
June 12th, 1795 - Spent when press warrants came 0 1 0
June 24th, 1797 - paid Mr Strutt for Army and Navy men's expenses 95 5 1


Formation of the Select Vestry.
Memorandum June 1st, 1801:
"Whereas a numerous set of men generally attend at the monthly Vestry meetings who are not particularly interested in the concerns of the Parish, and many of whom do not pay Poor Rates, and whose unauthorised interference in the said Vestry much retards the business of the township. For the better regulation and conducting the business of the township it is agreed at a meeting held this day that the select committee be appointed to assist the Overseers of the Poor of the township in the business of the Parish for one whole year from the day of the date hereof - conjointly with the churchwardens. It is also further agreed that the monthly meetings be held upon the 1st day of every month throughout the year in the Vestry Room in Glossop, except the first day fall upon a Sunday, then, and in that case, the meetings shall be held on the day following. It is further agreed that the meetings shall be held from Lady Day to Michaelmas precisely at 5 o'clock, and that the meetings from the Michaelmas to Lady Day shall be held precisely at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Also it is agreed that the Overseer of the Parish shall be fined for non-attendance at the time and place before mentioned unless a proper and sufficient cause be assigned, for each neglect the sum of 5s. Also it is further agreed that 16 persons be chosen to assist the said overseer in the execution and discharge of his said office. It is also further agreed that each person who shall be named in the committee shall be fined the sum of 2s. 6d. unless he signs in writing to the clerk of the meeting an excuse, and that excuse be allowed by a majority of the committee then present. All fines to be added to the Poor Rate. It is further agreed that the Rev. Mr. Howe be and is appointed clerk to the meeting. Committee: Mr Matthew Ellison, Mr James Robinson, for Glossop; Mr Thomas Frost, Mr John Hadfield, for Padfield; Mr John Thornley for Hadfield; Mr Joseph Cooper, Mr James Platt, junior, for Dinting; Mr Roberts, Mr John Kershaw, Mr John Bennett, for Whitfield; Mr Joseph Hadfield, Mr Thomas Bennett, for Simmondley; Mr John Lawton, Mr Joseph Jackson, for Charlesworth; Mr James Nield, Mr John Nield, for Chunal. Witness our hands, Christopher Howe, Vicar of Glossop; Thomas Winterbottom, George Siddall, churchwardens. Joseph Jackson, James Robinson, John Thornley, John Winterbottom, John Wood, James Nield, John Bennett, John Kershaw, Joseph Shepley, John Knott, Robert Lees, Roger Goodeson, Henry Kelsall, Joseph Cooper."

In 1808 the assessment of the parish was £3749. A rate of 4s. in the pound was made, collected in four instalments in May, July, September and December.

April 3, 1809: "It is mutually agreed that the Overseer and Constable shall from this day be allowed and paid only for their journeys to Bakewell, 8s.; Tideswell, 7s.; Castleton, 7s.; Chapel-en-le-Frith, 6s.
It is agreed that the Rev. Christopher Howe be and hereby is appointed Clerk to the Vestry, and that he be allowed annually the sum of £2 2s., to be paid on the first day of May, and that he be paid the sum of £1 1s. for the rent of the Vestry Room, the said rent to be paid annually, on the first day of May."

November 6, 1809: "It is this day agreed that if any of the Committee appointed for the present year do swear on oath in the Committee Room, or in any other room the Committee may adjourn into before the business of the day be finished, he or they shall forfeit the sum of one shilling, which said sum or sums shall be given and disposed of in and for such purposes as the Committee may direct or think proper, and should anyone refuse to pay the said forfeit, he or they shall be turned out of the Committee and another person shall be forthwith elected to serve in his room, and should any of the ley payers come into the room intoxicated or promote any quarrel in the Vestry Room, such person or persons shall be turned out of the room by the Committee."

February 7th, 1812: "Received from John Wilde, being a fine for hanging (poaching) hares, £1."

May 1st, 1817: "At a meeting held this day for the purpose of assessing cotton mills to the rate of the poor within the Township of Glossop, it is mutually agreed that every person occupying a cotton mill shall from this day be charged after the rate of six shillings and sixpence for each throw and spindles he may from time to time make use of for and towards every assessment made after the rate of one shilling in the pound.
It is also mutually agreed that every person who makes use of throstle spindles for every 200 to be charged as 750 mule spindles, and for every lathe turned for him to be charged as and in proportion to 100 mule spindles."

April 1st, 1819: “Ordered that a monthly list of the names of every person receiving parochial relief be monthly printed and hung up in every hamlet or village within this township for the inspection of the ley payers."
Received from persons liable to serve in the old Militia: Dinting: Daniel Nield, Richard Marshall, Thomas Garlick, John Garlick, John Nield, William Poole, Joseph Cooper, junr., Joseph Cooper, David Fernaley, John Hall, John Houslaw, John Platt. Twelve, at 6s. each, £3 12s., paid in by Mr Moss.
Padfield: Henry Lees, Samuel Broadbent, George Hadfield, John Hadfield, John Harrop. 30s., paid in by Mr William Barber.
Whitfield, Simmondley, and Chunal: Thomas Slater, John Etchells, Henry Lyne, James Johnson. 30s., paid in by Mr Howard.
Glossop: Richard Davenport. 6s. paid in by Mr Howe.
Hadfield: Joseph Dearnally, Joshua Lee, H. Groves, Isa Rowbottom, David Winterbottom, Thomas Warhurst, Joseph Bramhall, David Wood, John Dewsnap, George Higginbottom, Thomas Warhurst Mill, James Lee, John Wood, Thomas Warhurst, John Higginbottom, Thomas Shaw, Joshua Mosley, Samuel Bridge, Samuel Newton, James Mosley, John Harrop, Luke Broadbent, Joseph Broadbent, George Garlick, John Dearnaley, Samuel Wood, James Swindells, William Dearnaley, Jonathan Wood, John Garlick, Thomas Swindells, Samuel Wood Thomas Bray, Thomas Thornley. Paid in by Mr Moss.

1821.
Select Vestry Business:
Order-book for the Township of Glossop, Vestry Room, Glossop, March 22nd, 1821.
At a meeting held this day, pursuant to notice given for the purpose of having the proper persons to serve the office of Overseers of the Poor for the Township of Glossop for one whole year from the date hereof, it is mutually agreed that Mr Joshua Platt, of Padfield, farmer, and Mr Wm. Barber, of Padfield, cotton spinner, be, and are hereby appointed to serve the said office of Overseers of the Poor, they being allowed the sum of thirty pounds for their trouble or office, and to be subject in every respect to the rules and regulations heretofore entered in the Overseers book touching the office, as also respecting all journeys to magistrates, or elsewhere.
It is also mutually agreed that the following persons, namely, the Vicar for the time being, the Churchwardens for the time being, the Overseers for the time being, together with the following persons, namely: Messrs. Thomas Wilkinson and John Wagstaffe, Glossop; Thomas Thornley and John Garlick, Hadfield; James Hall and James Platt, Dinting; William Radcliffe and John Beeley, Whitfield; John Nield and Samuel Pickford, Chunal; John Bennett and Thomas Bredbury, Simmondley; Samuel Booth and William Bennett, Charlesworth; be and are hereby appointed to aid and assist the Overseer in the due execution of his office for the better and more effectual execution of the laws of relief of the poor and for the amendment of the same agreeable to an Act of Parliament made and passed on the 31st day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand and eight hundred and sixteen. It is also mutually agreed that Mr Thomas Ellison be appointed chairman for the present year. It is also mutually agreed that the Rev C. Howe, be and is hereby appointed our clerk for the present year, with a salary of five pounds and five shillings for his office.
Witness our hand this 22nd day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-one (1821). Christopher Howe, vicar; John Dearnally and Samuel Aveson (corn dealer, died suddenly Sunday, August 5th, 1824), churchwardens; Thomas Ellison, Thomas Wilkinson, Joseph Bennett, William Radcliffe, John Wagstaffe, Robert Robinson, Thomas Bradbury, James Pott, John Hampson, Samuel Pickford, Joseph Howard, Robert Shepley.

21st April, 1821: We, Samuel Frith and John White, Esquires, two of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace, in and for the County of Derby, do consent unto the above nomination according to the Act. — S. Frith, John White. Witness: Christopher Howe.

16th April, 1821: Thomas Ellison, appointed to make a new assessment.
Fathers of illegitimate children in arrears to be proceeded against.

28th June, 1821: William Howe, a pauper, for outrageous behaviour was brought by the Overseer before John White who committed him to the House of Correction at Tideswell, from thence he was sent to the Lunatic Asylum at Manchester, the parish to pay 10s. 6d. per week, and to pay a deposit down of £10 as security.

26th July, 1821: Overseer to sell the goods of the late Thomas Cooper, a pauper, the proceeds to be placed to the parish accounts.

4th October, 1821: Overseer authorized to defend a case brought by the Township of Hollingworth against the Township of Glossop touching the settlement of Phillip Batty. (The Overseer won the case at the Sessions).

24th January, 1822: Two troublesome paupers to go to Middlewick Workhouse, Cheshire; entrance fee £2 2s.; annual rent, £2 2s.; and maintenance, 10s. per week.

21st February, 1822: Resolved to give public notice in the Church on Sunday next and following Sunday of a public meeting on the 7th March. "To take into consideration the propriety of erecting a Workhouse for the reception of the paupers belonging to this Township."

7th March, 1822: It was unanimously agreed that it would be highly necessary, and of great advantage to the ley payers to have a House of Industry built as soon as circumstances will admit, and that a committee be appointed, consisting of the following persons, viz. Messrs. Thomas Ellison, Thomas Thornley, William Radcliffe, Robert Shepley, Thomas Wilkinson, Samuel Aveson, and John Goddard, to take the matter into due consideration; to look out a proper site of land for the purpose; to prepare a plan and estimate with specifications, and to report the progress at the next meeting, namely, March 21st, 1822.

25th March, 1823: John Wood chairman. Election of Overseer and Assistant Overseer. The committee having received the tickets tendered by the candidates proceeded to elect two persons to serve the said office of Overseers, when Joshua Platt, of Padfield, was elected as Overseer, and William Barber, of Padfield, as Assistant Overseer.

12th June, 1823: Thomas Wilkinson, John Kershaw, and Thomas Ellison appointed to examine, sort and arrange the deeds and securities upon which various sums of money have been lent by the Township, the same being in confusion and not properly scheduled.

24th July, 1823: Ordered that the Select Vestry do proceed to erect a hearse house, the old one being destroyed owing to the late repair of the Parish Church, also a lock-up house, and over the same a room sufficient for the transaction of parish business upon a piece of ground to be fixed upon by Mr. Thomas Ellison, the expenses of the same to be defrayed out of the rates collected by the Overseer of the Poor of this Township. - John Kershaw, chairman.

24th July, 1823: 1s. rate levied for the payment of repairs to Parish Church and erection of offices.

22nd January, 1824: John Wood of Glossop, and John Wood, of Hadfield, Thomas Ellison and Churchwardens appointed to examine claims of persons to seats in gallery, previous to alterations.

4th February, 1824: Faculty examined, and found to have been exceeded.

15th April, 1824: Joseph Higginbottom present. Ordered that £10 be allowed to Mr. Thomas Ellison for the improvements to the bridge near the parish offices, and the erection of a foot bridge near Mr. Wilkinson's house, and also that the further sum of £15 be allowed to Mr. Ellison for the widening of the bridge at the foot of Little Moor Hill.

16th September, 1824: Messrs. Sidebottom of Waterside having this day appeared in the Vestry requesting of reduction for certain spindles worked by them at their factory at Waterside. Ordered that the order made in the Vestry Room and entered in the order book of our Overseer be confirmed.

8th February, 1825: Benjamin Rolfe and John Hadfield appointed assessors of the land and other assessed taxes for the Hamlets of Glossop, Hadfield, Padfield and Dinting, and Joseph Bennett and Abraham Booth for Chunal, Simmondley and Whitfield for the present. John Wood, William Radcliffe and Robert Shepley to assist the Churchwardens in examining the state of the Church and to make an estimate of what is required to be done.

17th March, 1825: Henry Lees present, Robert Shepley, John Wood, Wm. Radcliffe, John Kershaw, John Bennett and Thomas Wilkinson to appoint a committee to examine roof of church and obtain plans and details. Committee reported that it would cost £247 15s. 4d. to finish the necessary repairs to the Church. Ordered that John Bancroft be called in to examine the Church.

29th September, 1825: Ordered that as the Churchwardens of Hayfield having refused to pay their share of the cost incurred by the rebuilding and repairing of Glossop Church, Mr. White of Park Hall, having been appointed by both parties to inspect the accounts and determine what sum they should pay, which they still refuse to and without any abatement, our Churchwardens are directed to enter an action at law against them for the recovery of the sum.

2nd, March, 1826: Edward Garside, Constable of Stalybridge having presented bill of expenses incurred by prosecuting three persons at the Derby Quarter Sessions for robbing the house of Sarah Warhurst, widow, amounting to £9 19s. 5d., it was ordered that our Overseer do pay him that sum. Sarah Warhurst agreeing to give a promissory note to Mr. Samuel Shepley, Churchwarden. for £5 of the above sum, payable six months after date.

7th December, 1826: Ordered that our Overseer do provide five pairs of blankets and five bed mats, as early period as possible for the Poor House.

29th March, 1827: That the Overseer has a ley assessed of one shilling in the pound for the relief of the poor and other purposes in the several Acts of Parliament relating to the poor for the Township of Glossop.

12th April, 1827: That from the time no allowance shall be made in the parish account for money expended in the purchase of public dinners. That the Vestry Clerk write to Messrs. Sidebottom of Waterside to request a fresh return of the number of spindles and looms they have at present in use as it appears in the Vestry, there is a material error in the return they have made.

23rd May, 1827: John Wood of Glossop in the chair. At a meeting of the ratepayers of the Township of Glossop held in the Vestry Room in Glossop, on Wednesday, 23rd May, 1827, and specially convened for the purpose of taking into consideration the present unfinished state of the Church and to decide upon such measures as might seem to be calculated for the repair and improvement of the said edifice.
Resolved that a committee of the Ratepayers of the Township of Glossop, be appointed for the purpose of ascertaining what sum of money has been expended in the recent repair of the Parish Church, and what further sum appears to such committee requisite to complete the needful reparation of the said edifice, and in making this enquiry and obtaining the necessary information the committee are hereby authorized to employ such architect or other competent person or persons to make any plan or estimate that may be considered necessary. And the said committee are hereby also directed to make a report of their enquiry to a public meeting of the ratepayers of the Township of Glossop, to be held for the special purpose of receiving their report and deciding thereon.
It was also resolved that such committee consist of the Churchwardens for the present year, and Messrs. Thomas Ellison, Robert Shepley, John Kershaw, James Bosley, Thomas Wilkinson, William Sidebottom, and Samuel Marsland.

11th June, 1827: John Wood of Glossop in the chair. The report from the said committee having been presented to the Chairman and read over to the meeting it was ordered unanimously that such reports be printed and four hundred copies of the same be circulated for the general information of the ratepayers. Resolved that a committee consisting of John White, Esq., Messrs. Thomas Ellison, William Sidebottom, and John Hadfield be appointed to ascertain what part or parts of the accounts of the Churchwardens for the year 1825-6 may have been irregularly entered on the parish books and to dispose of such part or parts of the account in such manner as they shall after due investigation deem fit and also that such committee shall have the power to add one gentleman of their number in case they be equally divided in opinion upon any matter which may arise during their investigations for the purpose of constituting a majority of the committee to be an individual totally free from any pecuniary interest in the subject of their investigation and the said committee are hereby directed to make report of their labours to a future public meeting of the ratepayers.
Resolved that the Churchwardens assisted by the committee hereinafter named be authorized to proceed immediately with the necessary repairs of the roof and flooring of the Parish Church of Glossop, such proportion of the expense of such repair to attach to the Chapelries of Hayfield and Mellor according to the terms of the agreement existing between such Chapelries and the Township of Glossop, the committee to consist of, John White, Esq., William Sidebottom, John Kershaw, Thomas Wilkinson, and John Hadfield.

11th July, 1827: Adjourned meeting of ratepayers. Ordered that the sum of £12 10s. each from the Chapelries of Hayfield and Mellor be paid towards the expense of the Church Gates lately erected at Glossop, the sum of £25 being considered as the proportion of one half of the proper expense of effectually repairing the gates.

27th September,1827: That the present Churchwardens do pay for the Church gates and the carriage of them, with the carriage of all letters respecting the same, and the charge for the design of the pillars for the same.

10th October, 1827: That our clerk call a meeting of the ley payers of the Township of Glossop, to be held on the 25th, instant at the hour of two in the afternoon, for the purpose of considering the propriety of erecting a Workhouse.

25th October, 1827: It being the opinion of this meeting that a Poor House should be erected, it is ordered that a committee consisting of John Shepley, James Bosley, and Joseph Bennett, of Turn Lee, be appointed for the purpose of ascertaining what would be the rent of a suitable piece of land and also for procuring plans and the necessary information respecting the same, and that they make their report to a future meeting to be convened for the purpose of receiving and entertaining the same.
Thomas Wilkins was constable for 1827.

8th November, 1827: The Overseer having reported to this meeting that some person (unknown) has left a young female child in Glossop, which has become chargeable to this parish, it is hereby ordered that unless something occurs by which the mother of the child may be found out before this day week, that our Clerk do insert an advertisement in the Manchester Guardian and Stockport papers, in order to see if any information can be obtained which may lead to the detection of the offending party.

6th November, 1828: Whereas there is a good number of vagrants strolling about this parish, and it appearing that it would be advisable to make an example of some of them, it is ordered that the Constable do take up one or more in each Township and take them before a magistrate at their next meeting.

25th February, 1829: That as much calico be given to Caroline Shepley's child as will make him two shirts, and that the Overseer do get him a pair of shoes, a frock, a bishop, and a petticoat.

26th March, 1829: At a meeting held this day, and specially convened for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of purchasing a new hearse and two sets of harness for the use of the township, the Churchwardens were authorized to get the above.

9th April, 1829: A reward of £2 2s. was offered for the apprehension of William Mather and Joseph Peters for deserting their families.

2nd July, 1829: At a special meeting held this day for the purpose of taking into consideration the repairing of Dinting Bridge, due notice having been given of the same by the Constable, it was ordered that the Constable be hereby authorized to make such repairs as he may think necessary.

30th July, 1829: The Churchwardens do provide immediately a vault or some other sufficient accommodation to contain the wine for use of the Sacrament Table, and also that they provide duplicate keys - one for themselves and one for the clergyman. That the allowance to the ringers for the next year be six guineas for ringing on Sundays - six shillings on the King's birthday - six shillings on the Coronation Day, and six shillings on the 29th of May.

30th July, 1829: That the allowance to the Church singers be as it usually has been, namely, three pounds per annum. That the Sexton and Clerk give no orders for anything belonging to their office without receiving orders from the Churchwardens for such purpose. That a cupboard be provided for the purpose of holding the plumes of the new hearse and protecting the same from injury by dust and dirt. That Mr. John Shaw be allowed to remove the old hearse and harness to Charlesworth for the use of that hamlet, and the others adjacent, upon his providing a place to put it and exonerating the Parish of Glossop from all expenses which may be incurred in respect of such removal.
That the sum of sixpence be charged to all persons requiring the use of the new hearse out of the confines of the eight townships of Glossop-dale for every mile that the said hearse should travel from the hearse house, and that they pay the further sum of one shilling and sixpence for cleaning the same.

14th January, 1830: That the sum of 15s. be paid to John Hollingworth's wife in consequence of his being wounded in a fray.

28th January, 1830: That the Overseer look out for a good second hand reel for William Winterbottom, and get Hannah Hadfield's reel repaired for Sarah Robinson.

25th March, 1830: Mr. John des Jardins was appointed Vestry Clerk for the ensuing year at a salary of £12 10s. 0d. A motion was made by Mr. John Goddard, and seconded by Mr. George White, that each member of the Select Vestry who attends at the regular adjourned meetings, and whose name is entered in the Vestry Order Book shall be allowed sixpence towards defraying his expenses and an amendment was made by Mr. James Bosley, and seconded by Mr. Samuel Roberts, that the above motion be put to the vote this day twelve months when a division took place, and the original motion was carried by a majority of ten.

25th March, 1830: That the Overseer do take William Rolley's boy to Manchester as soon as an opportunity occurs, for the purpose of having his hand examined by the Oldfield Lane Doctor.

8th April, 1830: That the Overseer do take William Rothwell before the magistrates on Saturday next if he does not go in the meantime to Mr. Wood's to work.

30th August, 1830: That the Overseer fetch a clock and some tables from Thomas Cooper's and sell them for the most he can get for the payment of his rent.

5th November, 1830: That it is the opinion of this meeting that the Churchwardens proceed with the alterations of the Church without it interfering with the steeple. That the roof be hipped to the square of the steeple according to the plan, No. 5 given by Mr. Chantrell That the top half of the pillars be taken away, and through beams be substituted in the roof. That the South front of the Church be taken down to the ground instead of down to the window sills. That the gallery be taken down, and that the Churchwardens apply for a faculty to erect new ones, according to the plan No. 2 and also for removing the pulpit and renewing the body of the Church. That the Churchwardens arrange with Mr. Chantrell to make the contract and superintend the work in the best manner they can.

10th February, 1831: That the parish officers take it upon themselves the responsibility of finding substitutes for the Militia for those persons who pay five shillings at present and ten shillings more for each man be allotted and that no money be received after the lots are drawn.

16th June, 1831: Ordered that William Knott be reduced one shilling per week the next time he gets mad. Ordered that Isabella Carrington be allowed 12s. and she go to Manchester and try for a situation and that she be allowed 1s. 6d. Week.

2nd January, 1832: At a meeting held this day, and specially convened for the purpose of taking into consideration the renewing of the bottom of the Parish Church and other particulars mentioned in the notice. Resolved that the Churchwardens proceed according to the plan laid before the meeting for the repair of the Church. Resolved that the Churchwardens be authorized to use such timber for the said purpose as they may think best suited to the purpose. Resolved that the Churchwardens be authorized to flag the aisle of the said Parish Church with good new flags at the expense of the ratepayers of the Township of Glossop. Resolved that the sum of one hundred pounds be allowed to the Churchwardens towards defraying the expense of a new pulpit, painting the King's Arms, Tablets and Commandments in the Parish Church, and that the Churchwardens are not to exceed the above mentioned sum with regard to the Chapelries of Hayfield and Mellor.

4th April, 1832: Ordered that Thomas Barker have the sum of twenty shillings advanced on condition that he does not trouble the parish for six months to come.

3rd May, 1832: Ordered that Thomas Garlick's wife be allowed the sum of five shillings as temporary relief and that the Overseer see Thomas Garlick and inform him that if he does not provide for his family better he must be sent to the treadmill.

17th May, 1832: At a meeting held this day pursuant to notice given for the express purpose of appointing Commissioners for the apportioning the seats in the West End Gallery of the Parish Church, as also the apportioning of the seats in the pews in the body of the said Church, as soon as the said seats shall be finished to the respective claimants.
John White, Esq., of Park Hall, Thomas Barns, of New Mills, gent, in the Parish of Glossop, George Hyde, of Tintwistle, in the County of Chester; and the Rev. Cecil William Bates, Vicar of Castleton; Matthew Freeman, incumbent of Mellor; and Samuel Grundy, incumbent of Chapel en le Frith, be and are hereby appointed Commissioners for the purpose above mentioned.

14th June, 1832: Ordered that there be a general meeting of the ratepayers to be held on Thursday the 28th June, at the hour of two o'clock in the afternoon for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of erecting a Poor House.

28th June, 1832: It was moved by Mr. Robert Shepley and seconded by Mr. John Goddard that there be a Poor House erected in this township, the motion being put it was carried by a majority of seven. Resolved that the following persons be and are hereby appointed a committee to carry the same into effect, viz., Messrs. John Bennett, Samuel Shepley, and John Goddard, and that they be empowered to look out for a proper site for the building, and to obtain details for the inspection and approbation of the Vestry on or before this day month. - Chris Howe, chairman.

1st November, 1832: At a special meeting of the ratepayers of the Township of Glossop, held at the public Vestry Room in Glossop, aforesaid, on the 1st November, 1832, and specially convened for the purpose of receiving the report of the committee appointed to obtain plans and to look out a proper place for the erection of a Poor House in this Township.
Messrs. John Goddard, Joseph Bennett and Samuel Shepley, brought in their report to this meeting together with a plan and specification for the erection of a Poor House when it was moved by Mr. Thomas Ellison, and seconded by Mr. Robert Shepley and unanimously voted, that the report presented to the meeting be received and that the thanks of the meeting be given to the said committee for the trouble they have been at in examining the different Poor Houses mentioned in their report and for preparing the said report and the plans and specifications which have been presented to this meeting.
Resolved that a committee of the following persons, viz., Mr. Samuel Shepley, John Goddard, Joseph Bennett, William Radcliffe, Thos. Wilkinson, and John Bennett be appointed for the purpose of taking into consideration the plans presented to the present meeting for a Workhouse for the poor of this township, and when they have approved of any one of them or other plan to arrange with the Duke of Norfolk's agent for a convenient site whereon to erect the same, and procure estimates of the expense of erecting and completing such building and that they do present their report to a meeting to be held on the 15th day of November instant, at the public Vestry Meeting Room in Glossop.

10th January, 1833: At a meeting held this day, and specially convened for the purpose, the report of the committee was presented for the building of the Poor House, considering the same, and making such order thereupon as may appear expedient, John Hollingworth in the chair.
A plan and specification of an intended Poor House at Glossop having been submitted to this meeting, it was resolved that a committee, consisting of Thomas Ellison, John Goddard, Joe Bennett, John Bennett, Samuel Shepley, and William Radcliffe, be and they are hereby appointed a committee for the purpose of publicly letting or otherwise entering into a contract with any persons desirous of contracting for the building and completing of a Poor House in Glossop, according to the plans and specifications presented to this meeting, and that such parties make arrangements for the purpose of borrowing the requisite funds and liquidating such loan after the rate of £100 per annum and that Mr. Samuel Shepley be appointed inspector of the works and for such attendance be remunerated at the expense of the parish.

7th February,1833: Ordered that the Overseer pays to the Orange Society the sum of one pound on James Dewsnap's account on condition that he pays the remainder of the money due from him to the aforesaid society.

7th March, 1833: The hiring of servants. Ordered that the Overseers be requested to inform the farmers and other persons in the habit of hiring servants that the gentlemen of the Select Vestry are wishful that they do not hire their servants for a longer period than fifty weeks. This was done to prevent them obtaining a settlement in the parish which would have entitled them to relief.

21st March, 1833: Ordered that John Rusby be and is hereby appointed Surgeon of the Parish at a salary of £8 per annum.

2nd May, 1833: Ordered that the Overseer summons George White before the magistrates to show cause why he refused to pay the Poor Rates for Glossop, Low Quarry.

18th May, 1833: Ordered that the arrears of Poor Ley due from George White to this township, for Glossop Low be reduced to the sum of £5 and the said quarry to be assessed for the present at the sum of forty shillings per Ley.

17th October, 1833: Ordered that John Rhodes be allowed the sum of 2s. 6d. as temporary relief, and if he does not obtain employment between now and the next meeting that he be sent to the treadmill. Ordered that if the parties who demolished the old hearse at Charlesworth do not come to the Vestry Meeting and make satisfaction to the parish they will be dealt with the utmost vigour of the law.

31st October, 1833: Ordered that Mr. James Bosley be authorized to repair the lockups and that the expense incurred in such repair be discharged by the parish. Ordered that the persons implicated in the sale and demolition of the old hearse be required to pay the sum of £10, which sum is to be apportioned to the use of the parish, and if not paid on or before the 14th day of November, the parties to be proceeded with as the law directs.
Part of the old hearse was made into a dog kennel and was long in the yard of the Bull's Head Inn, Charlesworth.

20th February, 1834: At a meeting held this day, and specially convened for the purpose of taking into consideration the appointment of a governor of the Workhouse and for other purposes relating to the same. Ordered that a governor of the Workhouse be advertised for with notice that his duties must embrace the management of the Poor House, the collection of the rates, and the general discharge of the duties of the Overseer of the Poor. The salary with maintenance and residence in the home, not to exceed £50 per annum. The applicant must be a married man of mature age without family, and be able to produce the most satisfactory testimony of his ability and character.
Ordered that the applications for the situation be addressed to the committee for the building and completion of the Workhouse, who are hereby instructed to receive such applications and make a report to the ratepayers for the ensuing year of the relative fitness of the different applicants for such situation, in order that the final appointment may be carried into effect.
Ordered that the committee appointed for the erection of the Workhouse be directed to proceed with the completion of the said workhouse and to furnish it so far as necessary for the accommodation of the paupers.

25th March, 1834: John Wood of Howardtown, and Samuel Shepley were nominated and appointed the Overseers of the Poor of the Parish of Glossop for the ensuing year, and Tobias Dickenson, of Burslem, was appointed Assistant Overseer and Governor of the Workhouse for the said Township for the same period with salary of £45, and the customary allowance of 4d. a mile for all journeys to the magistrates or elsewhere, out of the confines of the Townships when called upon by the duties of his office. A presentation was then made out of the said Overseers and signed for the purpose of sending the same to the magistrates for their definite appointment.

12th June, 1834: Special Meeting. The accounts of the committee for the erection of the Poor House having been submitted to this meeting, the same were examined and allowed as correct, and it appears that there is a balance of £29 11s. 1d. in the hands of the committee. Ordered that Mr. Samuel Shepley do receive the sum of £50 as a remuneration for the trouble of superintending the erection of the said Workhouse, and that he be requested to continue his services until the Workhouse be completed.

2nd October, 1834: Ordered that the sum of £1 0s. 6d. charged for decanters and glasses, be taken from the accounts of the Overseers. Ordered that Mr. John Goddard and Mr. Samuel Shepley be appointed to inspect the Hurst Bridge, and report accordingly by the next Vestry Meeting.

16th October, 1834: Mr John Goddard and Mr. Samuel Shepley, having brought in their report respecting the Hurst Bridge, it is ordered that the said bridge be rebuilt, and that it be not less than seven yards on the span and five yards wide.

15th March, 1835: Ordered that if the Assistant Overseer does not execute the duties of his office to the satisfaction of the ratepayers of this Township, the ratepayers shall have power to remove the said Assistant Overseer from such office by giving him three months notice, and if the Overseer be dissatisfied with his situation he may also be exonerated from the duties of his office on giving the like notice of three months.

30th April, 1835: Ordered that the Parish of Glossop do receive one half of the money allowed by the Friendly Society towards the burial of Isaac Garside; that the relatives of the said Isaac Garside be allowed to have his furniture.

28th May, 1835: Ordered that Joseph Howard do receive the sum of three pounds as a loan to enable him to purchase an ass and cart, and that he be required to pay back the aforesaid sum by instalments of five shillings a month till the whole be discharged.

11th June, 1835: Memorandum, that the Overseers let the old Vestry to John Ashworth at the yearly rent of £6 10s., to be paid quarterly, the rent to commence from 28th May, and the said John Ashworth be required to keep the premises in tenantable repair.

23rd July, 1835: At a meeting held this day in the Vestry of the Parish Church, and adjourned to the Vestry of the Workhouse, and specially convened for the purpose of making and assessing a rate for the necessary repairs of the Church, and for the purposes relating thereto, it was moved by Mr. Robert Shepley, and seconded by Mr Henry Massey, that there be a rate granted of one penny in the pound, to be collected with the Poor Rate, for the above mentioned purpose.

6th August, 1835: Ordered that the Overseers take Dr. Bowden to the Leeds retreat, and that they obtain the information they can respecting his settlement, and report thereon to the next Vestry meeting.

20th August, 1835: Ordered that if Warhurst (an inmate of the Workhouse) does not obtain employment in the course of a week, that the Overseer take him to the magistrates and get him committed for neglect of family.

29th October, 1835: Ordered that Cornelius Wyld be allowed to take the cart and as (as a loan), and that he endeavour to obtain a living thereby, and if it does not answer his purpose to return it again to the Overseers.

4th February, 1836: Ordered that the Overseers be instructed to proceed against the Oddfellows Society to recover a sum of money from that Society to Samuel Harrison. Ordered that the clothing belonging to the late Joseph Hadfield be given to his brother James.

17th March, 1836: Ordered that Cornelius Wyld be allowed the sum of thirty shillings to repair the wheels of his cart.

28th April, 1836: At a meeting held this day, and specially convened for the purpose of examining and auditing the accounts of the Constable for the last three months, and also for the purpose of taking into consideration a proposition which has been submitted to the Constable by the Trustees of the Chapel and Enterclough Bridge Road for the reconstruction of Little Moor Bridge and to make an order thereupon.
The proposition made by the Trustees of the Chapel and Enterclough Bridge Road having been submitted to this meeting, viz., That upon the appropriation of £100 from the Constable Rate they will undertake to defray the expense of taking down the present dilapidated bridge and rebuild a good substantial bridge in place of it. It is hereby ordered that the above mentioned sum of £100 be appropriated for the above purpose on condition that all future repairs be charged to the County Rate.

12th May, 1836: Ordered that Doctor Booth's account for attendance on John Hill be discharged by the Overseer.

25th May, 1836: Ordered that Ellen Harrison be allowed the sum of one shilling per week towards the maintenance of Mary Ann Green, a child belonging to the Township.

23rd June, 1836: Ordered that Mr. Thomas Wilkinson be and is hereby appointed treasurer to the Overseers of the Poor for the remaining part of the parochial year. A motion having been made by Mr. Joseph Oates, and seconded by Mr. John Beeley, that the assistant Overseer give security to the amount of £70, and an amendment having been made by Mr. Samuel Shepley, and seconded by Mr. Thomas Wilkinson, that the required sum be £300, and the amendment was put to the meeting and was carried by a majority.
Ordered that in future no horse shall be kept by the Assistant Overseer at the expense of this Township. Ordered that James Sheppard be and is hereby appointed Assistant Overseer and Governor of the Workhouse for the year ending March 25th, 1837, at a salary after the rate of £40 per annum, and the customary allowance of 4d. per mile for all journeys to the magistrates and elsewhere out of the confines of the Parish.

7th July, 1836: Mr. James Sheppard having been appointed Assistant Overseer at the last meeting, and since that meeting certain circumstances having transpired the said James Sheppard has addressed a note to the Chairman of this meeting stating his intention to resign his appointment. "Gentlemen. This is to inform you that I wish to resign the claim of being your Assistant Overseer for the next nine months, as there seems to be things about it rather unpleasant. Yours respectfully, James Sheppard.

13th September, 1836: Ordered that the account of 10s. as expenses incurred in taking the measurements of factories, etc., be allowed to Mr. Dickinson.

27th October, 1836: Ordered that the Head Constable be authorized to get a number of hand bills printed, strictly prohibiting all persons from making bonfires, and c. on the 5th of November, and that he circulate them in the eight townships of Glossop-dale.

16th February, 1837: Ordered that Mr. William Robinson be authorized to pay Thomas Coleman and family the sum of one shilling and sixpence per day, and a little white wine to be given at his own discretion till some arrangement is made for their removal to Woburn in Bedfordshire.

13th April, 1837: Ordered that freehold land and cottage property in the Eight Townships of Glossop-dale be assessed to the poor at percentage equal to the present advance upon the landed property belonging to his Grace the Duke of Norfolk, and that Mr. Dickinson be requested to see Mr. Ellison in order to get the proper information. Ordered that Mr. Samuel Shepley, of Brookfield be appointed the lessee of the land and buildings belonging to the Workhouse.

9th November, 1837: Ordered that Widow Jackson be allowed the sum of £1 5s. as a loan to purchase a reel, the money to be paid back at 5s. per month.

7th December, 1837: The accounts of the Constable for the last year having been submitted to this meeting and it appearing that the accounts not being properly arranged and other dispute having arisen respecting some of the items in the said accounts it is ordered that this meeting be adjourned to Friday, 22nd December at the hour of ten in the forenoon.

25th October, 1839: At a meeting of the ratepayers of the Township of Glossop held in pursuance of the following notice publicly posted in the several Townships.
CONSTABLE RATE.
Notice is hereby given that a public meeting of the ratepayers of Glossop and the adjoining Townships will be held in the Vestry Room of the Workhouse at Glossop, aforesaid, on Friday, 28th October, instant, at two o'clock in the afternoon for the purpose of levying a constable rate to defray the necessary expenses of the past and current years.
Signed John Kershaw.

28th October, 1839: It was moved by Mr. John Kershaw and seconded by Mr. Beeley, and unanimously resolved, that a rate of ten pence in the pound be assessed for the purpose of defraying the expenses of the Constable's accounts for the past and current years. The Constable was ordered to proceed forthwith in the collection of the rate for the required purposes of his department.

Extracts from the Minute Books of the Glossop Board of Guardians

6th December, 1837 (first meeting):
It was proposed by Thomas Ellison and seconded by James Bosley, and resolved, that the necessary arrangements be now signed to make the Glossop Union one for the purpose of rating and settlement.
Proposed by Thomas Ellison, and seconded by Joseph Cooper, that the office of Governor of the Workhouse, Clerk to the Board of Guardians, Relieving Officer, and Collector of the Poor Rate be filled by one officer. Carried.
Proposed by Thomas Ellison, and seconded by Henry Lees, £75 and maintenance from the stores of the house be the salary for the above appointment. Carried.
Proposed by Thomas Ellison, and seconded by John Shaw, that a horse be purchased for the use of the Union. Carried.
Proposed by Thomas Ellison and seconded by James Bradley, that Tobias Dickenson and his wife be Master and Matron of the Workhouse, and that the Clerk be the Relieving Officer and Collector of the Poor Rate. Carried.
Proposed by James Bosley, and seconded by William Platt, that ten guineas be the salary of the Auditor. Carried.
Proposed by Thomas Ellison, and seconded by John Wood (Howardtown) that £25, with maintenance from the Workhouse stores be the salary of the Porter and that the election of the Porter takes place at the next meeting. Carried.
Proposed by Thomas Ellison and seconded by William Platt, that the appointment of Chaplain to the Union Workhouse be deferred for further consideration. Carried.
Resolved unanimously that the Chairman. Thomas Ellison, and the Vice-chairman, James Bosley, be members of every committee that may be appointed.
Resolved that the following gentlemen be a committee to enquire and report to the Board of Guardians on the best means of providing Workhouse accommodation (with proper classification of inmates) for the Union: Samuel Shepley, John Goddard, Joseph Bennett (of Turn Lee), and James Bradley.
Resolved that two of the Guardians be requested to act as a visiting Committee in rotation for one month each.
Resolved that no resolution of this Board be rescinded or altered without two weeks previous notice to be given by the Clerk to all the Guardians.
Resolved that the Parish Officers be requested to continue the relief as heretofore until further orders.
Resolved that the division of the Union into Medical Districts be deferred to the next meeting.

15th December, 1837. (second meeting).:
Proposed by Joseph Cooper and seconded by Joseph Bennett, that all paupers coming into the Workhouse be requested to attend Divine Service in the Parish Church unless conscientiously objecting thereto. Carried.
Proposed by James Bosley and seconded by John Goddard, that our Medical Officer be appointed for the whole of the Union, with a salary of £20 per annum, and that he be required to attend upon all paupers, both in and out of the Workhouse. Carried. The candidates for the office of Surgeon were Messrs. John Rusby and William Wardlow Howard.
It was proposed by James Bosley, and seconded by John Goddard, that John Rusby be appointed the Medical Officer. The name was put to the vote and carried unanimously.
Ordered that a public notice be given throughout the Union for a person to undertake the offices of Porter and Schoolmaster to the Workhouse, and that the Clerk receive all applications and testimonials in writing, and submit them to the Board on the day of the next meeting.

22nd December, 1837:
Proposed by James Bosley, and seconded by Samuel Marsland, that as no proper application is made for the office of Porter and Schoolmaster to the Workhouse, the appointment be postponed for the present.

12th January, 1838:
A dietary scale from the Workhouse in Manchester was this day presented to the Board. Ordered that the same scale of diet be adopted in the Glossop Workhouse, and strictly adhered to, as soon as practicable. Paupers were allowed 1 oz. of tobacco per week

5th June, 1840:
A discussion having arisen as to indemnifying the Union from expenses incident in obtaining orders in bastardy, the females in many instances obtaining sufficient employment as to be able to support their offspring without parochial assistance, immediately after an order has been obtained against the putative father;
Moved by Mr. Goddard, seconded by Mr Higginbotham, and passed by a majority, that such expenses be recovered from the reputed fathers, wherever practicable, as soon as the females become enabled to support their children without assistance; then the order to remain suspended till the event of chargeability occurring a second time.

6th November,1840:
Ordered that the sum of £1 be paid to William Smalley, residing at Stockport, with an understanding that he commence the business of a travelling tinker and not make application for any more relief within the next six months, unless attacked with sickness, so as to entirely prevent him from following any employment.

27th November, 1840:
The Chairman having read the Vaccination Act, and the letters on that subject from the Poor Law Commissioners, a motion was made by Mr. Wood, seconded by Mr. Platt, and resolved, that the sum of 1s. be given for each successful case under the Vaccination Act, and that John Rusby, junior, the Medical Officer of the Union, be appointed to vaccinate all children born within the Union in compliance with the provisions of the said Act; the same was put to the vote and passed.
Resolved that the Clerk write to the Poor Law Commissioners and acquaint them of the proceedings of this meeting, and that it is their intention to bring the provisions of the aforesaid Act into operation, as soon as the contracts are completed and have received the sanction of the said Commissioners.
That the Clerk acquaint the Medical Officers who have signified their intention to become candidates in this matter, and state that Mr. Rusby is appointed to vaccinate all children in this Union under the Vaccination Act, on account of the Guardians.

15th January, 1841:
Henry Bradshaw from Holehouse, an orphan, aged 11 years, being represented by the Medical Officer to be consumptive, it was agreed that the sum of 2s. per week be allowed to Jeremiah Jackson for his care and maintenance during sickness.

25th March, 1841: Election of Guardians.
Thomas Ellison, Glossop Hall, gentleman.
Joseph Bennett, Turnlee, cotton manufacturer.
James Bosley, Whitfield, cotton manufacturer.
John Goddard, Waterside, farmer.
Joseph Higginbotham, Mossy Lea, farmer.
John Kershaw, Hurst, cotton manufacturer.
Henry Lees, Woolley Bridge, cotton manufacturer.
Samuel Marsland, Best Hill, cotton manufacturer.
George Platt, Padfield, farmer.
Robert Shepley, Glossop, cotton manufacturer.
James Sidebottom, Waterside, cotton manufacturer.
Francis J. Sumner, Primrose, cotton manufacturer.
John Wood, Howardtown, cotton manufacturer.
Jonathan Wright, Milltown, cotton manufacturer.
Henry Brierley, Moorside, Chisworth, farmer.
John Wright, Marple Bridge, innkeeper.

23rd April, 1841:
That the Clerk write to Mr. J. Harrison, Market Place, Belper, and order six iron bedsteads for the Workhouse, to be made large enough for two up-grown persons, the same to be made forthwith, and sent to Glossop by the cheapest known conveyance, Mr. Harrison having agreed to make them at his usual contract price, as for other unions.
That the Clerk make application to the Royal Infirmary, Manchester, to enquire if George Warhurst, now in the Workhouse, can be admitted as an in patient into the institution for the purpose of having his leg amputated, if found necessary.

21st May, 1841:
It was moved by Mr. Shepley, and seconded by Mr. Goddard, and carried, that the salary of Mr. Dickinson, as Clerk to the Board of Guardians, be in future (after the expiration of this quarter) £50 per annum, instead of £75 per annum.

30th July, 1841:
Robert Bunting from Stockport, was allowed the sum of 10s. being without employment, and his wife confined of twins.

15th September, 1841:
A motion was made by Mr. George Platt, and seconded by Mr. Bosley, that a statement be made by Mr. John Goddard, John Kershaw, and George Platt, of all the able bodied paupers at present receiving out door relief, and the average weekly cost per head be also taken, and compared with the average cost it would take to maintain the same paupers in the Workhouse, and submitted to the Poor Law Commissioners. The same was put to the vote and passed unanimously.

11th October, 1841:
At a meeting held this day, and specially convened for the purpose of appointing a Clerk Relieving Officer, and Registrar, vacant through the dismissal of Mr. Tobias Dickinson by the Poor Law Commissioners and the Registrar General.
It was moved by Mr. George Platt, that Mr. E.W. Thompson, of Howardtown, is a fit and proper person to fill the office of Clerk and Registrar for the Union, and seconded by Mr. Robert Shepley.
It was moved, as an amendment, be Mr. Jas. Bosley, and seconded by Mr. James Sidebottom, that Mr. George Bowden, of Glossop, is a fit and proper person to fill the offices of Clerk and Registrar for the district.
On the motion being put to the vote four of the Guardians present and the chairman voted for Mr. George Bowden, and two for Mr. Thompson. Mr. George Platt presented the proxies of Messrs. John Wood, F. J. Sumner, and Henry Lees in favour of Mr. E. W. Thompson. All the Guardians present protested against the practice of voting by proxy.
It was moved by Mr. James Bosley, and seconded by Mr George Platt, that Mr. James Waterhouse be appointed Relieving Officer to the Union, with an addition of £15 per annum, and it was carried unanimously.
It was moved by Mr. Jonathan Wright, and seconded by Mr. Henry Brierley, that Mr. Robert Kershaw, of Charlestown, and Mr. John Wood of Howardtown, be appointed auditors of the accounts; carried unanimously. Mem. That Mr. George Bowden has been appointed Clerk, with a salary of £20 per annum.

11th March, 1842:
A motion was made by Mr John Wright, and seconded by Mr Henry Brierley, that a memorial be drawn up and signed by the ratepayers of Ludworth and Chisworth, and that the said memorial be presented next Board day for the signature of the Guardians and sent to the Poor Law Commissioners, for the purpose of obtaining the sanction to a separation of the said Townships of Ludworth and Chisworth, so far as regards the collection of their own rates, the payment of their own poor, and the general management of their own parochial affairs. The motion having been put to the vote was carried unanimously.

25th March, 1842: Election of Guardians.
Joseph Beresford, Glossop, cotton manufacturer.
James Bosley, Whitfield, cotton manufacturer.
John Goddard, Waterside, farmer.
Joseph Howard, Bridgefield, cotton manufacturer.
John Hadfield, Cowbrook, cotton manufacturer.
Henry Lees, Woolley Bridge, cotton manufacturer.
Samuel Marsland, Best Hill, cotton manufacturer.
George Platt, Padfield, farmer.
William Platt, Hadfield Lodge, cotton manufacturer.
Robert Shepley, Glossop, cotton manufacturer.
James Sidebottom, Waterside, cotton manufacturer.
William Shepley, Brookfield, cotton manufacturer.
Francis J. Sumner, Primrose, cotton manufacturer.
John Wood, Howardtown, cotton manufacturer.
Henry Brierley, Moorside, Chisworth, farmer.
John Wright, Marple Bridge, innkeeper.

20th May, 1842:
A motion was made by Mr. William Shepley, and seconded by Mr Robert Shepley, that in future some refreshments be allowed the Guardians on a Board day from the Workhouse stores.

1st July, 1842:
Richard Marshall was reappointed Collector of the Poor Rate, to be allowed the sum of £12 10s. per rate of one shilling in the pound.

29th July, 1842:
A motion was made by Mr. Robert Shepley and seconded by Mr. James Bosley, that the old Vestry Room be let for the sum of £5 per annum for the purpose of teaching a day and Sunday School in connexion with the Established Church.
Resolved (as there is a quantity of land attached to the Workhouse and no outbuilding thereon) that there be a barn and cowhouse built; that the expense of such erection be defrayed out of the funds of the Union and that the Clerk be instructed to communicate with the Poor Law Commissioners requesting their sanction and approval of such erection.

12th August, 1842:
Edward Wainwright and family being desirous of emigrating to New Zealand, and the company requiring a certain quantity of clothing to be taken out, it is ordered that the sum of £4 be allowed him to purchase the articles required, and that he bring an account to Mr. Waterhouse how he has expended the money.
Amelia Bennett, a widow, residing in Manchester, was allowed the sum of £6, being six months in advance of her regular pay, to purchase a mangle, so that she may be enabled to earn a livelihood for herself and family without parochial assistance.

26th August, 1842:
An account amounting to £3 5s. being the salary of the doorkeeper to the magistrates, was laid before the Board, and it appearing that it is an illegal charge on the Poor Rate, and (if paid) would be liable to be struck out of the accounts by the Auditor, ordered that it be discharged by the Constable.

9th September, 1842:
A motion was made by Mr. Robert Shepley and seconded by Mr. James Bosley, that Edwin Kinder and family be sent to America (being anxious themselves to go there) and that the expense be defrayed out of the funds of the Union.

7th October, 1842:
Ordered that the Clerk convene a public meeting of the ratepayers of the eight Townships, to be held in the Board Room on Friday, 14th Oct., at two o'clock in the afternoon, for the purpose of nominating a list of persons residing within the said Townships, to be presented to the magistrates as qualified and liable to serve the office of constable for the ensuing year.

4th November, 1842:
Ordered that if any factory or other property is unoccupied, and shall remain so for the space of six months after an assessment has been made, that the rate or amount charged in the assessment shall be reduced to one half.

16th December, 1842:
Ordered that the Master of the Workhouse provide a number of stone hammers for the use of the paupers, and that the able bodied be set to work breaking stone. At this meeting, 12 men, receiving outdoor relief were ordered to come to the Workhouse to break stones.

13th January, 1843:
Benjamin Newton having been ill of typhus fever, and having five children, was allowed 10s. and one loaf for the next fortnight; also 1s. 2d. for a pair of clogs. It appears from the minutes that small pox and typhoid fever were very prevalent in Glossop at this period.

27th January, 1843:
Sarah Taylor, a pauper, belonging and now chargeable to this Union, being wishful to go to her husband (a private soldier now quartered at Woolwich) he having requested her to do so, it is ordered that the Relieving Officer be instructed to make inquiry which is the best way, and what the probable expense will be, and that he furnish her with what may be necessary for the journey, and enter the name in his weekly out door relief list.

24th February, 1843:
Ordered that Mr. Goddard be empowered to take a quantity of work from the contractor of the Manchester and Sheffield Railway, and that the able bodied paupers be set to work thereon.

25th March, 1843: Election of Guardians.
John Goddard (ex officio) Greenfield Cottage, gentleman.
Joseph Beresford, Glossop, cotton manufacturer.
John Bowden, Coombs Mill, cotton manufacturer.
John Hampson, Whitfield, farmer.
Joseph Howard, Bridgefield, cotton manufacturer.
John Kershaw, Hurst, cotton manufacturer.
Samuel Marsland, Best Hill, cotton manufacturer.
George Platt, Padfield, farmer.
William Platt, Hadfield Lodge, cotton manufacturer.
Thomas Platt, Dinting, farmer.
William Shepley, Brookfield, cotton manufacturer.
James Shepley, Glossop, cotton manufacturer.
James Sidebottom, Waterside, cotton manufacturer.
Robert Sheppard, Whitfield Barn, farmer.
John Wood Howardtown, cotton manufacturer.
Henry Brierley, Moorside, Chisworth, farmer.
John Wright, Marple Bridge, innkeeper.

7th April, 1843:
A motion having been made by Mr. John Bowden, and seconded by Mr. Joseph Howard, that Mr. Rusby be appointed Medical Officer of the Union for 12 months, at a salary of £25 without any fees whatever; it was put to the vote and carried unanimously.

11th June, 1843:
The sum of £1 having been given to John Priestnall and family as relief in the year 1811, it has this day been repaid in order that his widow may be entitled to Hague's Charity clothing. Ordered that it be handed to the Overseers of the Poor and entered in the receipt and payment book.

30th June, 1843:
Ordered that an iron gate be placed at the bottom of each stairs in the Workhouse to prevent the inmates from going up and down at pleasure. Ordered that the clothing of the inmates of the Workhouse be uniform, and that a quantity be provided for that purpose.

1st January, 1844:
Ordered that the Constables of Padfield and Chisworth be instructed to inspect the bridges belonging to their several Townships, and make report thereon as early as convenient

8th March, 1844:
Ordered that the Clerk be instructed to warn all the Guardians to attend the next meeting of the Board, to be held on the 22nd, and that at that meeting the Guardians do proceed to the election of a Medical Officer for the Union to succeed Mr. John Rusby, who is about to retire from the office on the 25th March next.
Ordered that the Clerk be instructed to address circulars to the different medical men residing within the Union to inform them of the time and place of such election, and also inform them that candidates for the office must posses the qualifications required by the Medical Officer of the Poor Law Commissioners, dated 12th March, 1842.
Allowed a tramp on her way to Sheffield, taken ill at Woodcock Road, 1s. 6d. in money. A widow, in receipt of a weekly allowance, was refused any further relief in consequence of having had an illegitimate child, and refusing to tell the name of the father of the child.

22nd March, 1844:
A motion was made by Mr. William Platt, and seconded by Mr Robert Sheppard, that Mr. Thomas Turton, be appointed Medical Officer and Vaccinator of the Union for the next twelve months, and an amendment was made by Mr. John Kershaw, and seconded by Mr Samuel Marsland, that Mr. William Wardlow Howard be appointed Medical Officer of the Union and Vaccinator for the next twelve months. The amendment having been put to the vote, was carried by a majority of five.
Ordered that the salary of the Medical Officer be £25 per annum, and the fees allowed by the Medical Order of the 12th March, 1842, and that the sum of one shilling be allowed for each successful case of vaccination.

25th March, 1844: Election of Guardians.
John Goddard (ex officio), Greenfield Cottage, gentleman.
Joseph Beresford, Glossop, cotton manufacturer.
John Hall, Charlesworth, shopkeeper.
John Hampson, Whitfield, farmer.
Joseph Howard, Bridgefield, cotton manufacturer.
John Kershaw, Hurst, cotton manufacturer.
Samuel Marsland, Best Hill, cotton manufacturer.
George Platt, Padfield, farmer.
William Platt, Hadfield Lodge, cotton manufacturer.
Francis J. Sumner, Primrose, cotton manufacturer.
William Shepley, Brookfield, cotton manufacturer.
James Sidebottom, Waterside, cotton manufacturer.
James Shepley, Glossop, cotton manufacturer.
Robert Sheppard, Whitfield Barn, farmer.
John Wood, Howardtown, cotton manufacturer.
Henry Brierley, Moorside Chisworth, farmer.
John Wright, Marple Bridge, innkeeper.

3rd May, 1844:
As the area of the Union, as rated to the relief of the poor, comprises only 10,528 acres, though the whole area of the Union is 20,807 acres, this Board deems it expedient to form the Union into more than one Medical Officer's district, as required by the Medical Order of the 12th March, 1842. It is unanimously resolved that the whole of this Union should comprise one Medical Officer's district, subject to the sanction and approval of the Poor Law Commissioners.

17th May, 1844:
The Overseers of the Poor having paid Mr Robert Shepley the sum of £105, being the last instalment on the Workhouse, and one years interest due March 25th; ordered that the Overseers be credited with the amount in their receipt and payment book.

9th August, 1844:
Moved by Mr. James Sidebottom, and seconded by Mr. Geo. Platt, that there be shelves put up in the store room and in the bedrooms of the Workhouse, with curtains in front, for the convenience of the paupers. Moved by Mr. George Platt, and seconded by Mr. Robert Sheppard, that the land held by lease under his Grace the Duke of Norfolk for the term of 99 years, be enclosed with a wall not less than six feet in height, and there be good stone stumps and wooden gates placed at the bottom of the garden.
Moved by Mr. George Platt, and seconded by Mr. Joseph Howard, that Mr James Waterhouse pay the sum of nine shillings for breakfasting 12 persons at the funeral of his daughter. Moved by Mr. Robert Sheppard, and seconded by Mr. Joseph Beresford, that the sum of three pounds be allowed to Mr. Waterhouse, being a sum given him as "boot" in exchange for a horse.

25th September, 1844:
Resolved that the clothing to be provided for the indoor paupers be made of moleskin of a drab colour, to consist of coat, waistcoat, and trousers, the coat to be made in the form of a Spencer, without laps, but to cover the breech and to be lined with pocket fustian, the waistcoat and trousers to be lined with linsey, the buttons to be made of horn with four holes in. Resolved that contracts be entered into for 40 suits of the following sizes, viz., to fit boys from 5 to 9 years of age, 14 suits; boys from 9 to 16, 8 suits; youths from 16 to 20, 6 suits; men's from 20 and upwards, 12 suits; and that the Clerk be instructed to issue notices throughout the Union for the supply of the same, and that the Master of the Workhouse be appointed to receive tenders, with samples of cloth, and submit them to the board on Friday, the 4th day of October next.

15th November, 1844:
A motion was made by Mr. William Shepley and seconded by Mr. Joseph Howard, that Mr. George Platt, of Padfield, be appointed chairman in place of Mr. John Goddard, deceased; the motion having been put to the vote was carried unanimously.
A motion was made by Mr. Joseph Howard and seconded by Mr. Henry Brierley, that Mr. William Shepley, of Brookfield, be appointed vice-chairman, in place of Mr. George Platt. The motion having been put, was carried unanimously.
Resolved; "That this Board, deeply impressed with a sense of the services of the late chairman, John Goddard, Esq., takes the earliest opportunity of entering upon its minutes a record of the zeal, ability, and integrity, which ever distinguished his conduct, and requests Mr. George Platt to convey to Mrs. Goddard an expression of their feelings, and an assurance of the sympathy of the Board upon the melancholy decease of this most excellent officer of the Union."
John Hyde of New Mills, was allowed 14s. to enable him to purchase an ass.

24th January, 1845:
Thomas Goodwin, the contractor for clothing agreed to give one large suit extra, in consideration of the first suits not being made according to contract.

20th March, 1845:
It was moved by Mr. Joseph Beresford, and seconded by Mr. Joseph Howard, and unanimously resolved, that Mr. John Sellars be appointed schoolmaster at the Workhouse, with a salary of ten guineas per annum, without rations, whose duty it shall be to attend the Workhouse four days in the week, two or three hours in the day, to teach the children reading writing and arithmetic.

6th June, 1851:
Ordered that a well for a pump be sunk at the back of the Workhouse, and that Mr. Waterhouse be instructed to make the best bargain he can with Abraham Hadfield for the completion of the work, and that an agreement be drawn up and signed for the due execution thereof.

7th November, 1851:
A letter from the Poor Law Commissioners having been laid before the Board, recommending to the serious consideration of the Guardians the expediency of a revision of the medical arrangements of the Union, it was moved by Mr. John Kershaw, and seconded by Mr. Daniel Wood, that the Union be divided into two districts for medical purposes - one district to comprise the Townships of Glossop, Hadfield, Padfield and Dinting, and containing a population of 10,177; the other district to comprise the Townships of Whitfield, Chunal, Simmondley, Charlesworth, Chisworth and Ludworth, and containing a population of 9,404. The motion having been put to the vote was carried with one dissentient.
Resolved that in the opinion of this Board that Dr. Howard, the present Medical Officer of the Union, has conducted himself during the seven years he has held the office both to the satisfaction of the Guardians and of the poor of the district, and they would wish him to continue in office (subject to the approval of the Poor Law Board) until 25th March next

2nd January, 1852:
It appearing that there were three candidates for the office (Medical Officer to the new district) the Board proceeded to vote by ballot, when Mr. Thomas Turton, obtained seven votes; Mr. Smith of Howardtown, three; and Mr Wardleworth, of Ludworth, two. Mr. Turton was therefore declared duly elected.

30th January, 1852:
A letter from the Poor Law Commissioners was laid before the Board pointing out to the Guardians that the offices of District Medical Officer and Medical Officer of the Workhouse are quite distinct, and that it is necessary that a separate salary be assigned to Mr. Howard in each capacity, and that the Board are of opinion that the amount of salary which he receives as District Medical Officer is not greater than should be paid to him for his services in that capacity alone. The Board recommend the Guardians to assign to him a salary of £10 per annum as Medical Officer at the Workhouse. The Board also observe that Mr. Turton does not reside in the district for which he has been appointed, while there is a medical man residing in that district, and supposed to be qualified for the office, and request to be furnished with the Guardians observations on the point, and to be made more fully aware of their reasons for electing a medical man who resides out of the district in preference to one residing in it.
It was resolved that the sum of £7 per annum be assigned to Mr. William Wardlow Howard as Medical Officer of the Workhouse and with reference to the appointment of Mr. Turton in preference to Mr. Wardleworth, the Guardians wish to observe that although Mr. Turton does not reside in the district he is within one hundred yards of it, and quite close to the bulk of the population. He has also promised to open a surgery at Charlesworth, three miles off, for the convenience of the more distant and thinly populated parts of the district; Mr Wardleworth resides at the extreme end of the district, six miles from the most populated part, and if the Commissioners will only refer to the Ordnance Map and look at Marple Bridge, close to which Mr. Wardleworth resides, and then look at Milltown, where Mr. Turton resides, they will at once perceive the impropriety of having appointed Mr. Wardleworth.

It will be seen from the extracts from the Unions minute books that the Poor Law Guardians looked well after the ratepayers interests. They were exceedingly careful in their expenditure and the amounts granted for relief. Much was given in kind from the Workhouse stores, such as meal and treacle for porridge. Those who had outdoor relief were compelled, if able, (both men, women and boys), to go to the Workhouse and break stone at a certain price, so that only in cases of illness or infirmity did they escape doing some kind of labour.

It is astonishing what a large number of cases they had of wife desertion. At nearly every meeting it was ordered that warrants should be obtained against someone who had left his wife and family to be supported by the Union. Every help was given to the deserted wife to earn a living. Clothing and bedding was furnished where needed; furniture bought to enable them to set up house keeping again where the home had been broken up. Loans were advanced to be repaid at 6d. per week; club contributions paid to keep a person in benefit, a small sum being deducted weekly from the relief allowed until repaid.
Crime must have been prevalent to a greater extent than now, for there are many items such as "Ordered that __________ be received into the House, her husband being in prison." Illegitimacy was shockingly common. The unfortunate mother could have no relief given to her unless she went into the Workhouse, when at the next meeting, application for a bastardy order was made against the reputed father, who too often, absconded to escape payment. Many enlisted into the Army or emigrated. Much expense was incurred in obtaining proofs of the settlements of paupers and in removing them back to their own parishes.

It will be noticed that a large percentage of the Guardians were cotton masters who attended; and were on the Board for many years. They were in a measure indirectly responsible for so many people living in the parish, who were not born in the parish, but had come from other places to work in the cotton mills. The rapid increase of the cotton industry required more workpeople, and these were brought mostly from Lancashire and Yorkshire, and in times of bad trade or illness, application had to be made to their Unions for relief, and where this was refused, the parties were moved back again to where they had come from. It was a vexatious and costly system.

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